Videos

Alum Creek Pollinator Study

When most people think of bees, they think of the European honeybee. However, there are hundreds of bee species native to the southeastern US that provide essential pollination services for native plants and crops. The Southern Research Station is currently studying the diversity of bees and other pollinators on all 19 of the southeastern Experimental Forests to better understand how forest composition and management affects these important insects.

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Direct Seeding of Southern Pine

As late as the 1960s there were still millions of acres of cutover forest land resulting from the harvest of the virgin forests during the early 20th century. It was projected that it would take 50 years to plant nursery grown seedlings to reforest this land. Hence, the effort to sow seeds directly—the technique became successful and greatly speeded reforestation efforts.

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Restoration Research of the American Chestnut (Part 1: Intro)

The American chestnut was once a common and abundant tree species that occupied 200 million acres in the eastern hardwood forests of North America. The species had a cultural significance and was a keystone species, providing wildlife with food and habitat sources. Two non-native pathogens led to the chestnut's extirpation in the 20th century, but efforts are underway to conserve and restore this iconic tree.

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Restoration Research of the American Chestnut (Part 2: Science in Action)

The USDA Forest Service, The University of Tennessee, and other partners showcase their research on the American chestnut (Castanea dentata), a species that was extirpated by a non-native pathogen (Cryphonectria parasitica) that causes chestnut blight disease. Over 4,000 hybrid chestnuts that were bred for blight-resistance were planted on three national forests since 2009, and research is still ongoing.

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American chestnut research in the Southern Appalachians

Forest Service Research Forester, Stacy Clark, describes how planted American chestnuts bred for resistance to a non-native pathogen (Cryphonectria parasitica) that causes chestnut blight are performing in southern Appalachian forests.

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Hydrate Short Stories: Coweeta Lab Part 1

Join Project Leader Chelcy Ford Miniat for an exploration of the purpose and history of the Coweeta Hydrologic Laboratory.

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Hydrate Short Stories: Coweeta Lab Part 2

Join Project Leader Chelcy Ford Miniat for an exploration of the purpose and history of the Coweeta Hydrologic Laboratory.

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Kids in the Woods

Through the Kids in the Woods program in Gainesville, FL, middle school students learn about birds, creek erosion and urban trees through hands-on outdoor science studies on the school campus and in a nearby nature park. This program is a partnership between the Southern Research Station (SRS-4952) and Region 8, the University of Florida, the Alachua County School District, the City of Gainesville Parks, Recreation and Cultural Affairs, and the Alachua County Environmental Protection Department.

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CATT - Staunton River Fun

Get a first-person, “fish eye” view of a brook trout inventory! The Southern Research Station Center for Aquatic Technology Transfer team counts trout populations each year. Follow along with one trout to learn how and why these inventories are performed.

Videos Archive