First-Year Effects of Shelterwood Cutting, Wildlife Thinning, and Prescribed Burning on Oak Regeneration and Competitors in Tennessee Oak-Hickory Forests

This article is part of a larger document. View the larger document here.

  • Author(s): Jackson, Samuel W.; Buckley, David S.
  • Date: 2004
  • Station ID: Miscellaneous Publication-SRS-

Abstract

Oak regeneration has declined significantly over the past century in many regions of the United States. Pre-scribed burning, herbicides, and cutting are all potentially viable methods of favoring oak regeneration by removing competitors, but evaluation of these methods in all regions of the Eastern United States is incomplete. We compared effects of four treatments on oak regeneration and competitors: Shelterwood cutting, wildlife thinning using herbicide, wildlife thinning using herbicide combined with prescribed burning, and prescribed burning with no overstory treatment. Light, soil moisture, herbs, shrubs, woody reproduction, and overstory structure were measured to quantify treatment effects. Shelterwood harvests and wildlife thinnings significantly increased light availability and reduced overstory and midstory cover. Prescribed fire signifi-cantly increased the density of oak seedlings and sprouts < 10 cm tall. Prescribed fire also reduced the density of red maple regeneration, but significantly increased the density of sassafras and yellow-poplar regeneration.

  • Citation: Jackson, Samuel W.; Buckley, David S. 2004. First-Year Effects of Shelterwood Cutting, Wildlife Thinning, and Prescribed Burning on Oak Regeneration and Competitors in Tennessee Oak-Hickory Forests. Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS–71. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station. pp. 231-237

Requesting Print Publications

Publication requests are subject to availability. Fiscal responsibility limits the hardcopies of publications we produce and distribute. Electronic versions of publications may be downloaded, distributed and printed.

Please make any requests at pubrequest@fs.fed.us.

Publication Notes

  • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.
  • Our online publications are scanned and captured using Adobe Acrobat. During the capture process some typographical errors may occur. Please contact the SRS webmaster if you notice any errors which make this publication unusable.
  • To view this article, download the latest version of Adobe Acrobat Reader.