Special forest products in context: gatherers and gathering in the Eastern United States

  • Authors: Emery, Marla R.; Ginger, Clare; Newman, Siri; Giammusso, Michael R.B.
  • Publication Year: 2003
  • Publication Series: General Technical Report (GTR)
  • Source: Gen. Tech. Rep. NE-306. Newtown Squre, PA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Northeastern Research Station. 59 p.
  • DOI: 10.2737/NE-GTR-306

Abstract

This report provides an introduction to the people who gather special forest products (SFPs) in the eastern United States, the role these resources play in their lives, and implications for management on national forest lands, particularly in relation to the Pilot Program on Forest Botanicals (P. L. 106-113, ? 339(a)). SFPs encompass a wide variety of products and provide important livelihood support through both market and nonmarket economic values. In addition, many gatherers value social dimensions of SFPs outside the economic realm. Gatherers are a diverse group (men and women, varied ethnic and cultural backgrounds), who often draw on substantial knowledge to harvest SFPs. Many are concerned about conservation and the sustainability of harvesting practices. Contextual factors affecting SFP activities include land management regimes and social conditions, such as household economies and life stage, at scales that range from macro-level markets (national, international) to micro-level household and individual use.

  • Citation: Emery, Marla R.; Ginger, Clare; Newman, Siri; Giammusso, Michael R.B. 2003. Special forest products in context: gatherers and gathering in the Eastern United States. Gen. Tech. Rep. NE-306. Newtown Squre, PA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Northeastern Research Station. 59 p.
  • Keywords: forest botanicals, nontimber forest products, forest management, fair market value, nonmarket values, traditional ecological knowledge, land use change
  • Posted Date: April 1, 1980
  • Modified Date: August 22, 2006
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    Publication Notes

    • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.
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