Forest science in the South: Summary of accomplishments for fiscal year 2008

 


Forest watershed science

Management or demise of forests can affect water quality and quantity. Restoration of bottomland hardwoods, riparian forests on agricultural lands, and wetlands can help re-establish ecological functions and connections. Forest Watershed Science is working to provide knowledge and technology to generate social, economic, and environmental benefits.

A Southern Research Station author wrote a conservation buffers field guidebook that promotes multifunctional landscape management. The book offers a concise yet comprehensive synthesis of science-based guidelines for planning and designing conservation buffers, corridors, and greenways in rural and urban settings. More than 80 illustrated designs show how to protect soil, improve air and water quality, enhance fish and wildlife habitat, provide recreation opportunities, and improve economic returns. The guidebook has been translated into Chinese, Spanish, and French, and is available in print and online at www.unl.edu/nac/bufferguidelines.

Mississippi is home to about 63 described crayfish species and at least 10 more that require classification. Station scientists led an effort to increase awareness about crayfish diversity in the State, to assist students and scientists in identifying crayfishes, and to educate people about crayfishes, including the diverse habitats they occupy and their many roles in ecosystems. The Crayfishes of Mississippi poster features stunning photos of about half of the State’s species. A Web site provides interactive maps of species distribution, photos to aid in identification, and fact sheets. Searches on the Crayfishes of Mississippi Web site (maps.fs.fed.us/crayfish) can be conducted by species or geographic area.

Infestation of Southern Appalachian eastern hemlock stands by the hemlock woolly adelgid (HWA) is expected to have dramatic and lasting effects on forest structure and function. Station scientists found that HWA infestation significantly reduced diameter growth of hemlock stems. This decline was offset to some extent by a concurrent but moderate increase in stem growth of hardwood trees in the stand. Production of hemlock fine roots and outward flow of soil carbon dioxide were reduced by HWA infestation, suggesting rapid declines in hemlock productivity. The accelerated debris resulting from eventual hemlock mortality are likely to influence carbon and nutrient flow, and to dictate future patterns of species regeneration in these ecosystems.

Eastern hemlock decline and replacement from Maine to Alabama
Potential impacts to forested systems threatened by the introduced hemlock wooly adelgid are great because of hemlock's role as a foundation species that influences soil, vegetation, and stream characteristics.
...more...
Recovery of nitrogen pools and processes in degraded riparian zones in the S outhern Appalachians
Establishment of riparian buffers is an effective method for reducing nutrient input to streams.
...more...

Vegetative structure found to be more important than food abundance for songbird use
Scientists used an experimental approach to investigate whether bird use differed on forest canopy gaps between treated (arthropods were reduced through insecticide application) and control (untreated) areas within a bottomland hardwood forest in the Upper Coastal Plain of South Carolina.
...more...

Avoiding epicormic branches on southern bottomland hardwood trees
Epicormic branches develop from dormant buds found along the main bole of hardwood trees, and they can cause significant reductions in both log grade and subsequent lumber value.
...more..

Hydrologic regime effects on the sustainability of endangered pondberry
Pondberry (Lindera melissifolia ) is a federally endangered shrub endemic to the Southeastern United States.
...more...

75 th Anniversary of Coweeta Hydrologic Laboratory celebrated with open-house and participation in Folk Heritage Days
The Coweeta Hydrologic Laboratory organized a 1-day open-house and participated in Folk Heritage Days in honor of its 75 th a nniversary.
...more...

Efficiency efforts build relationships and save funds
An all-work unit convened to increase efficiency and productivity among staff and scientists.
...more..

Citizen Scientists Enhance Ecological Data, Harness Indigenous Knowledge, and Increase Ecological Awareness among Local Communities
Since 1997, more than 2.4 million pounds of b lack cohosh ( Actaea racemosa ) root have been harvested from the hardwood forests of Appalachia to ease women's suffering from menopausal symptoms.
...more...

International Rusty Blackbird Technical Group
A Station scientist is a member of the steering committee of the International Rusty Blackbird Technical Group, an ad hoc organization of numerous governmental, nongovernmental, academic and other institutions in the United Stat es and Canada, formed in 2005.
...more...

International Activities
A Station scientist and leader in nontimber forest products (NTFP) participated in the 2 nd World Congress of Agroforestry in Nairobi, Kenya.
...more..

Awards
The Association for Communication Excellence in Agriculture, Natural Resources, and Life and Human Sciences bestowed a Gold Award on Conservation Buffers-Design Guidelines for Buffers, Corridors, and Greenways .
...more...

New products in 2009 for forest watershed science
...more..

Eastern hemlock decline and replacement from Maine to Alabama

Potential impacts to forested systems threatened by the introduced hemlock wooly adelgid are great because of hemlock's role as a foundation species that influences soil, vegetation, and stream characteristics. Station scientists installed a long-term study at 49 sites, from Maine to Alabama, designed to survey eastern hemlock health, measure stand dynamics, and predict replacement of eastern hemlock. Hemlock wooly adelgid was present in 24 stands from Massachusetts to Georgia , and all of these stands had so me degree of hemlock decline. Other N ew England States, Ohio, W estern Pennsylvania, Kentucky , and Alabama had no hemlock wooly adelgid pr esent, and hemlock health was good. Coniferous replacements for eastern hemlock were gen erally scarce and not diverse. Eighteen of the 49 sites had no non-hemlock conifer replacement in the overstory , and 30 of 49 sites had less than 10 m 2 ha -1 of no n-hemlock conifer replacement. Hardwood species in the oversto ry were diverse and extensive. Hard woods comprised a mean of 43 percent of the tot al basal area across all sites. However, if eastern hemlock were removed from the stands, hardwood would make up a me an of 78 percent of the basal area in all stands. Without eastern hemlock, 25 of the stands, mostly in the mid-Atlantic and Southern S tates would have greater tha n 90 percent hardwood in the overstory. Contact: Andrew Dolloff (ADolloff@fs.fed.us)

Recovery of nitrogen pools and processes in degraded riparian zones in the S outhern Appalachians

Establishment of riparian buffers is an effective method for reducing nutrient input to streams. However, the underlying biogeochemical processes are not fully understood. A Station scientist and EPA collaborators studied the effects of riparian zone restoration on soil nitrogen ( N ) cycling mechanisms in a mountain pasture previously degraded by cattle. Soil inorganic N pools, fluxes, and transformation mechanisms were compared across the following experimental treatments: (i) a restored area with vegetation regrowth; (ii) a degraded riparian area with simulated effects of continued grazing by compaction, vegetation removal, and nutrient addition (+N) ; and (iii) a degraded riparian area with simulated compaction and vegetation removal only (-N). Soil solution NO 3 - concentrations and fluxes of inorgan ic N in overland flow were >90 percent lower in the restored treatment relative to the degraded (+N) treatment. Soil solution NO 3 - concentrations decreased more rapidly in the restored treatment relative to the degraded

(-N) following cattle exclusion. Mineralization and nitrification rates in the restored treatment were similar to the degraded (-N ) treatment and, on average, 75 percent lower than in the degraded (+N) treatment. Nitrogen trace gas fluxes indicated that restoration increased the relative importance of denitrification, relative to nitrification, as a pathway by which N is diverted from the receiving stream to the atmosphere. Changes in soil nutrient cycling mechanisms following restoration of the degraded riparian zone were primarily driven by cessation of N inputs. The recovery rate, however, was influenced by the rate of vegetation regrowth. Contact: James Vose (jvose@fs.fed.us)

Vegetative structure found to be more important than food abundance for songbird use

Scientists used an experimental approach to investigate whether bird use differed on forest canopy gaps between treated (arthropods were reduced through insecticide application) and control (untreated) areas within a bottomland hardwood forest in the Upper Coastal Plain of South Carolina. Bird use of early-successional canopy gaps was not affected by arthropod reduction. Birds may have been negatively affected by the reduced arthropod abundance in treated gaps via reduced foraging efficiency, but even this did not induce them to abandon the area. Birds apparently were attracted to the regenerating canopy gaps by their overall vegetative structure rather than by the abundant food resource base there. The abundance of food resources may not be as important in determining avian habitat selection as previous research has indicated, at least for forest-breeding songbirds that use early-successional forest gaps in the Southeastern United States. Contact: John C. Kilgo (jkilgo@fs.fed.us)

Avoiding epicormic branches on southern bottomland hardwood trees

Epicormic branches develop from dormant buds found along the main bole of hardwood trees, and they can cause significant reductions in both log grade and subsequent lumber value. Species, stress, and sunlight have been proposed as the three major factors affecting the production of epicormic branches. Studies found that hardwood tree species vary considerably in their propensity to produce epicormic branches. Most oak species, except cherrybark oak, produced several epicormic branches, even in undisturbed stands, whereas green ash produced few. Across all species, production of epicormic branches generally decreased with increasing tree diameter. Small-diameter willow oaks were especially susceptible to the production of epicormic branches. In general, upper-crown-class trees produced few epicormic branches, whereas lower-crown-class trees produced many. In contrast, stand density appeared to exert little influence on production of epicormic branches by most hardwood species in undisturbed stands. However, production of epicormic branches on Nuttall oak may be somewhat sensitive to stand density. Contact: James S. Meadows (smeadows01@fs.fed.us)

Hydrologic regime effects on the sustainability of endangered pondberry

Pondberry (Lindera melissifolia ) is a federally endangered shrub endemic to the Southeastern United States. A large-scale study investigated the relationship of stem density and hydrologic regime to growth characteristics and intraspecific competition of male and female pondberry. Male and female plants responded similarly to flood duration beyond 14 days by abscising leaves and ceasing growth. Generally, growth characteristics under flood and no-flood conditions did not differ between male and female plants. However, male plants appeared to be better adapted than female plants for colonizing suitable habitat. Both timing and duration of flooding can have a critical impact on first-year, metabolically active pondberry. Therefore, management of periodicity and duration of flooding events should be incorporated into management plans. In reintroduction efforts, limiting interspecific competition with female plants may be necessary until the female plant and subsequent colony become established. Contact: Tracy S. Hawkins (tracyhawkins@fs.fed.us)

75 th Anniversary of Coweeta Hydrologic Laboratory celebrated with open-house and participation in Folk Heritage Days

The Coweeta Hydrologic Laboratory organized a 1-day open-house and participated in Folk Heritage Days in honor of its 75 th a nniversary. The open-house and Folk Heritage Days were designed to provide public awareness of USDA Forest Service, Southern Research Station research by highlighting the state-of-the-knowledge on hydrology, ecology, and ecophysiology of the Southern Appalachians. Coweeta s cientists and staff participated in both events. The open-house included posters, presentations, and demonstrations from scientific experts and professional staff. Coweeta Hydrologic Laboratory staffed a booth at Folk Heritage Days, where scientists used posters and demonstrat ions to discuss relevant topics such as climate, biological diversity, and the history of American chestnut. The open house was attended by 239 people representing local agencies and landowner, as well as NGO s . The Folk Heritage Days event was attended by hundred s of seasonal and permanent residents of W estern North Carolina. Contact: James Vose (jvose@fs.fed.us)

Efficiency efforts build relationships and save funds

An all-work unit convened to increase efficiency and productivity among staff and scientists. Discussions among employees from all locations included sharing equipment, technicians, and technical and administrative expert knowledge. A google.blog was established for all technicians and support staff to provide a clearing-house for sharing expertise. The staff has taken advantage of new relationships and mechanisms by creating opportunities to share knowledge and field personnel. The unit has saved funds in a number of areas, including training (training available within the unit, e.g., LiCor CO 2 analyzer for carbon balance research, climate stations with multiplexer and data logger technology related to Campbell Scientific Training) and personnel sharing (e.g., scheduling technicians among subunits to make up critical mass for field work). Reducing the size of the forest fleet saved approximately $6,500 per year in fixed costs and reduced administration.

Partnerships

Citizen Scientists Enhance Ecological Data, Harness Indigenous Knowledge, and Increase Ecological Awareness among Local Communities

Since 1997, m ore than 2.4 million pounds of b lack cohosh ( Actaea racemosa ) root have been harvested from the hardwood forests of Appalachia to ease women's suffering from menopausal symptoms. No efforts are made to manage this resource , and it is extracted from forests without concern for long-term viability. In 2004, a scientist with the National Agroforestry Center partnered with members of the Plant Conservation Alliance, particularly the Garden Club of America and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to examine the impact of harvesting on plant populations , with the intent of providing valuable knowledge that will lead to better management of this valuable resource. Permanent long-term study plots were estab lished in two locations on national f orests in Virginia. Over the years, the partners hip has grown to include the Virginia Native Plant Society, the USDA National Arboretum, the National Parks Conservation Association, Master Naturalists, Radford University, Grayson County Landcare, and others. Volunteer partners cover personal lodging, meals and fuel costs. They inventory plants and harvest the roots. Citizen scientists use personal digital assistants to collect and store data , which are directly transferred to lab computers , eliminating the need for tedious data handling and potential processing problems. Data are used to address how to inventory root volume using above-ground biomass. The involvement of volunteer citizen scientists enables the scientist to collect data he otherwise wouldn't have the resou rces to do. As importantly, this volunteer partnership produce a more informed, better educated group of concerned people who can champion a conservation message for native medicinal plants.

International Rusty Blackbird Technical Group

A Station scientist is a member of the steering committee of the International Rusty Blackbird Technical Group, an ad hoc organization of numerous governmental, nongovernmental, academic and other institutions in the United Stat es and Canada, formed in 2005. More than 20 organizations are involved in the work , including the U . S . Fish and Wildlife Service; Mississippi State University , Delta Branch Experiment Station; U . S . Forest Service , Delta National Forest; and the Smithsonian Institute. Members of the g roup are documenting the status, distribution, and threats to the population of this species, whose num bers have declined more than 90 percent since the 1970s. In 2009, the group sponsored a very successful Rusty Blackbird "BLITZ" in which 173 interested participants sought wintering Rusty Blackbirds and located them at 204 of 453 locations surveyed all across the Southern U nited S tates , where the birds spend the nonbreeding season. SRS s cientists collaborated on a manuscript surveying changes in bottomland hardwood forests across the South to associate habitat changes with population declines. Their unit has hosted visiting scientists annually since 2005 and collaborated with them on their studies of the birds in the landscape of the Mississippi Alluvial Valley. Contact: Paul B. Hamel (phamel@fs.fed.us)

International Activities

A Station scientist and leader in nontimber forest products (NTFP) participated in the 2 nd World Congress of Agroforestry in Nairobi, Kenya. There is growing importance for developing sustainable management guidelines and market development for NTFP. Participation in the congress enabled widespread exposure of the work that the Forest Service is doing to help guide sustainable production of NTFP species and development and delivery of NTFP information. The scientist exchanged information about the needs of the nontraditional stakeholder groups involved in NTFP harvest and p roduction, and represented USDA National Agroforestry to the international agroforestry audience.

A Station scientist delivered an invited oral presentation titled "Aspects of Planning and Design for Multifunction Riparian Zones" to the Clubs-Conseil en Agroenvironment in Quebec City, QC, Canada. Participation in the meeting promoted greater collaboration with Canadian counterparts involved in productive conservation programs and enhanced development and delivery of agroforestry science relevant to North American use.

A Station scientist delivered an oral presentation titled "Policy and Programs that Support Agroforestry in the USA" at the Workshop on Environmental Goods and Services from Agroforestry, in Quebec City, QC, Canada. Participation in the meeting promoted greater collaboration with Canadian counterparts involved in productive conservation programs and enhanced development of delivery of agroforestry science relevant to North American use. Ag Canada is funding the translation of Conservation Buffers-Design Guidelines for Buffers, Corridors, and Greenways into French.

Station scientists hosted a delegation of scientists from the Chinese Academy of Forestry, Beijing, at the Coweeta Hydrologic Laboratory. This effort enhanced the international exchange of knowledge on hydrologic processes in forested watersheds.

A Station scientist and project leader co-chaired and his unit co-sponsored the 2 nd International Conference on Forests and Water in a Changing Environment. International partners collaborated to share knowledge about ecohydrologic science, which has tremendous value for maintaining, restoring, and enhancing water quality and supply.

 

A Station scientist co-authored a technical paper presented at the International Commission on Irrigation & Drainage (ICID)'s 23 rd European Regional Conference on "Progress in Managing Water for Food and Rural Development" in Lviv, Ukraine. Sharing of long-term hydrologic data provided an opportunity to highlight the Forest Service's role in long-term hydrologic research among participating European scientists and researchers. Data from the pine forest site is unique and critical in understanding rainfall-runoff relationships for drained eco-systems.

A Station scientist participated as a cooperator/coauthor for the annual report "Hydrologic Effects of Pine Plantation on Grasslands in Uruguay, South America" submitted to Wyerhaeuser Foundation by North Carolina State University. Estimation of annual potential and actual evapotranspiration helps advance understanding of evapotranspiration processes and effects on water yield where grasslands have been converted to pine forest.

A Station scientist invited an international scholar from the University of Antwerp in Belgium to visit . The engineer presented a seminar on "A Study on Retention of Matter in River Ecosystems using an Integrated Modeling Approach" and explored potential research collaborations on modeling the interactions amon g the hydrological and biogeochemical processes that influenced the retention of organic matter in stream ecosystems.

A Station scientist participates as an invited editorial member of the Polish journal Acta Scientarum Polonorum - Formatio Circumiectus ( Environmental Processes ), a Polish journal. This effort to publish high quality scientific articles will be mutually beneficial to professional societies in Poland and United States.

A Station scientist presented science-based information and provided advice and counsel to the Queensland Environmental Protection Authority, Rockhamption, Australia about protection of aquatic habitats from selenium pollution. The Queensland EPA adopted Lemly's reccomended guidelines.

A Station scientist co-chairs the Peatland Forestry Section of IUFRO. A leadership position in an international forestry research organization reflects positively on the Forest Service and helps ensure U.S. involvement in the activities of IUFRO.

A Station scientist consults for the Millennium Challenge Corporation. The project reflects the recognition of leadership in wetland restoration and provides a unique opportunity for technology transfer. The work also is consistent with the Forest Service's International Programs office to assist U.S. agencies in international development.

A Station scientist attended a meeting of the North American Forest Commissio n's Silviculture Working Group in Victoria, BC, Canada . The working group developed a pos ition paper around the theme "C ompetitiveness of the Forest Sector " and planned a workshop to be held in 2010. The group helps the Forest Service to carry out its mandate to promote sustainable forest management and biodiversity conservation internationally.

A Station scientist served as coordinator of IUFRO Working Group 5.01.07 (tree ring research) 2005-2010 and as coordinator of IUFRO Division 1 Research Group: Silviculture and Management of Threatened and Endangered Tree Species, 2005-2010, and planned two sessions at the IUFRO World Forestry Congress to be held in Seoul, Korea in 2010. Activity in IUFRO helps the Forest Service carry out its mandate to promote sustainable forest management and biodiversity conservation internationally.

 

A Station scientist serves as a member of the scientific committee of the 8th International Conference on Dendrochronology, to be held in Rovaniemi, Finland, 12-18 June, 2010. This activity helps the Forest Service carry out its mandate to promote sustainable forest management and biodiversity conservation internationally.

Two Station scientists hosted two Brazilian student interns who volunteered with the unit from December, 2008 through March, 2009 and two more who volunteered from July, 2009 through November8, 2009. The students are majoring in forest engineering. They studied pondberry ( Lindera melissifolia ) seed predation using video cameras with infrared illumination and a video recorder to monitor animal visitors to seed plots. The purpose of the study was to detect pondberry seed predators and estimate visitation frequency of the seed plots by animals. The students have also installed a study of ecological succession in the Overcup Oak Research Natural Area in the Delta National Forest, MS , and are collecting data. They also helped with bird migration monitoring. The visits have provided the students with new research experiences , and they have provided Station scientists with valuable assistance in several studies.

A Station scientist presented a paper at the short rotations crops international conference. The paper will appear in a refereed publication in a special issue of Biomass Bioenergy .

A Station scientist co-authored a presentation at an IUFRO conference in Rome, Italy. The conference addressed "Innovation and New Horizons in Tree Nursery Stock Production and Forest Restoration - from Research to Business." Presenting at the conference provided an opportunity to exchange scientific and technical knowledge gained through research on seedling quality and afforestation systems for restoration of forests on former agricultural land.

A Station scientist organized and chaired the Cerulean Warbler Summit 3/ Golden-winged Warbler Summit 2 - "Conservation Planning for Migrant and Resident Birds in the Northern Andes" in Bogota and San Vicente de Chucuri, Colombia. He served as chair of the organizing committee for this event, which included the scientific program, as well as presentations to the citizens of San Vicente de Chucuri, of awards and a plaque to the citizens, from the members of the Cerulean Warbler Technical Group and Golden-winged Warbler Working Group. Approximately 100 persons from nine countries attended summit activities. A meeting with a representative of the Colombian Coffee Federation provided guidance to develop further projects related to biodiversity conservation and management of coffee farms. Significant interactions among members of Cerulean Warbler Technical Group and Golden-winged Warbler Working Group have improved communication and research coordination within and between these groups and conservation entities in South America.

A Station scientist travelled to Indonesia, Java, and Sulawesi to bioprospect for novel cellulases. He trained Indonesian scientists and collected microbes in Sulawesi. This trip was funded by a grant from the National Institutes for Health and the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Working with a team, the scientist and others isolated more than 200 easily culturable microbes from the digestive tracts of wood-boring beetle larvae. Ultimately, the microbes will be screened for cellulase activity and pharmacological properties.

A Station scientist collaborated on a proposal with to coordinate a session on "Aquatic Biodiversity Conservation in Forests" for the upcoming XXIII IUFRO World Congress to be held 23-28 August 2010 in Seoul, Republic of Korea. The Congress reviewing c ommittee accepted the proposal , and the coordinators are preparing to solicit papers and posters for the session. The goal is t o stimulate thinking and interest within the international forest research community on the importance of forests for maintaining aquatic biodiversity.

A Station scientist collaborated with an Italian postdoctoral researcher to write an invited international review article for the journal Sensors . The article provided a synthesis of international research advances and applications in diverse research fields for the internationally important topic of electronic aroma detection (EAD) or electronic-nose (e-nose) technologies. This review article elucidated a wide diversity of e-nose applications developed hitherto over the past 20 years from diverse disciplines, and revealed for the first time some new, surprising uses in many previously unknown areas of agriculture, biomedical, environmental, forestry, homeland security, manufacturing, military, pharmaceutical, and regulatory as well as various scientific research fields; providing a much broader view of the diverse functionality, practical application range, versatile capabilities, and beneficial utilities afforded by e-nose technologies.

 

Awards

The Association for Communication Excellence in Agriculture, Natural Resources, and Life and Human Sciences bestowed a Gold Award on Conservation Buffers-Design Guidelines for Buffers, Corridors, and Greenways . The field guide includes over 80 illustrated design guidelines from a review of 1,400 research publications. Guidelines are presented as rules-of-thumb to protect soil, improve air and water quality, enhance fish and wildlife habitat, provide recreation opportunities, and improve economic returns. A user can assess potential trade-offs to design a buffer that can best provide multiple benefits while minimizing conflicts. Conservation Buffers has been translated into Chinese, Spanish, and French. The guidebook (GTR SRS-109) is available in print and online at http://www.unl.edu/nac/bufferguidelines/

A Station scientist received a citation from the Montana Division of the American Fisheries Society for coauthorship of the best professional presentation, "Climate change mediates the spatial partitioning of sculpin and longnose dace leading to trophic cascades in riverine ecosystems of western Montana."

A Station scientist was appointed to the Southeast Domain Science and Education Coordinating Committee of the National Science Foundation's National Ecological Observatory Network. She was nominated to represent the Forest Service and forest/wetland management perspectives in advising science and education planning for the Southeastern NEON.

The Society of Wetland Scientists South-Central Chapter elected a Station scientist to its executive board, which advises on chapter science and education activities.

The Chief of the Forest Service awarded a Station scientist with the Bronze Presidential Volunteer Service Award to recognize 100-249 hours of service.

The President's Science Office honored a Station scientist with the Presidential Early Career Scientist Award in recognition of his research on freshwater mussel ecology.

A Station scientist received the Station Director's Global Stewardship Award for exemplary leadership and demonstration of the power of partnerships in the development of a sound scientific basis for the conservation of the Cerulean Warbler.

Two Station scientists received the Station Director's Partnership Award for dedicated and innovative partnership and leadership in the study of food insects of ivory-billed woodpeckers.

The University of Maine, Department of Wildlife Ecology , bestowed an Award for Professional Excellence on a Station scientist, honoring his extraordinary, long-term contributions to the wildlife profession and wildlife conservation .

The Station honored a hydrologic technician with a certificate of appreciation i n recognition of many years of dedication, diligence, and service to the Station's Civil Rights Committee .

2009 Products

Amatya, D.M.; Edwards, A.E. 2008. Applying the SWAT hydrologic model on a watershed containing forested karst. In: Beneath the Forest. 1(1): 12-13.
http://www.srs.fs.usda.gov/pubs/33825

Amatya, Devendra M.; Skaggs, Wayne R.; Trettin, Carl C. Advancing the science of forest hydrology A challenge to agricultural and biological engineers. 2009. Resource. 16(5): 10-11.
http://www.srs.fs.usda.gov/pubs/33402

Adams, S. B. 2008. Female reproductive characteristics of three species in the Orconectes subgenus Trisellescens and comparisons to other Orconectes species. Freshwater Crayfish 16:147-153.
http://www.srs.fs.usda.gov/pubs/34110

Adams, S. B. 2009. Mississippi Crayfishes website: http://maps.fs.fed.us/crayfish/.

Adams, S. B. and G. Henderson. 2008. Missississippi crayfishes database. Available via website: http://maps.fs.fed.us/crayfish/.

Amatya, D.M.; Callahan, T.J.; Radecki-Pawlik, A.; Drewes, P.; Trettin, C.; Hansen, W.F. 2008. Hydrologic and water quality monitoring on Turkey Creek watershed, Francis Marion National Forest, SC. In: Proceedings of the 2008 South Carolina Water Resources Conference, Charleston Area Event Center
http://www.srs.fs.usda.gov/pubs/31988

Amatya, D.M.; Williams, T.M.; Edwards, A.E.; Levine, N.S.; Hitchcock, D.R. 2008. Application of SWAT Hydrologic model for TMDL development on Chapel Branch Creek watershed, SC. In: Proceedings of the 2008 South Carolina Water Resources conference, October 14-15, 2008. Charleston, SC.
http://www.srs.fs.usda.gov/pubs/33827

Amatya, Devendra M.; Callahan, Timothy J.; Trettin, Carl C.; Radecki-Pawlik, Artur. 2009. Hydrologic and water quality monitoring on Turkey Creek Watershed, Francis Marion National Forest, SC. In: 2009 ASABE Annual International meeting. June 21-24, 2009, Reno Nevada. American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers (ASABE).

Appelboom, T.W.; Chescheir, G.M.; Skaggs, R.W.; Gilliam, J.W.; Amatya, D.M. 2008. Nitrogen balance for a plantation forest drainage canal on the North Carolina Coastal Plain. American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers. 51(4): 1215-1233.
http://www.srs.fs.usda.gov/pubs/33740

Ardon, Marcelo; Pringle, Catherine J.; Eggert, Susan L. 2009. Does leaf chemistry differentially affect breakdown in tropical versus temperate streams? Importance of standardized analytical techniques to measure leaf chemistry. Journal of the North American Benthological Society. 28(2):
http://www.srs.fs.usda.gov/pubs/33872

Aubrey, Doug P.; Teskey, Robert O. 2009. Root-derived CO2 efflux via xylem stream rivals soil CO2 efflux. New Phytologist. 184(1): 35-40. doi: 10.1111/j.1469-8137.2009.02971.x
http://www.srs.fs.usda.gov/pubs/33860

B. E. Borders, W. M. Harrison, M.L. Clutter, B. D. Shiver and R.A. Souter. 2008. The Value of Timber Inventory Information. Can. J. For. Res. 38: 2287-2294.
http://www.srs.fs.usda.gov/pubs/33715

Baldwin, T.E., F. Chan, Y. Wang. 2009. The effect of moisture related habitat features on amphibian occurrence in the southern Cumberland Plateau in Northern Alabama. Alabama Chapter of the Wildlife Society. Clanton, Alabama. March 31- April 1, 2009. [Poster]

Baldwin, T.E.;Y. Wang. 2009. Methods for predicting the occurrence of amphibians in oak hickory forests along an environmental gradient in the Mid Cumberland Plateau. Southeastern Biology 56 (2). [Abstract]

Ball, Becky A.; Bradford, Mark A.; Coleman, Dave C.; Hunter, Mark D. 2009. Linkages between below and aboveground communities: Decomposer responses to simulated tree species loss are largely additive. Soil Biology & Biochemistry. 41: 1155-1163. doi: 10.1016/j.soilbio.2009.02.025.

Ball, Becky A.; Bradford, Mark A.; Hunter, Mark D. 2009. Nitrogen and Phosphorus release from mixed litter layers is lower than predicted from single species decay. Ecosystems. 12: 87-100. doi: 10.1007/s10021-008-9208-2.
http://www.srs.fs.usda.gov/pubs/33739

Banzhaf, G.M. 2009. Log grade volume distribution model for tree species in red oak-sweetgum forests in southern bottomlands. Mississippi State, MS: Mississippi State University. 79 p. M.S. thesis.

Beckage, Brian; Kloeppel, Brian D.; Yenkley, J. Alan; Taylor, Sharon F.; Coleman, David C. 2008. Differential effects of understory and overstory gaps on tree regeneration. Journal of The Torrey Botanical Society Volume 135: pp. 1-11
http://www.srs.fs.usda.gov/pubs/31587

Bentrup, G. 2008. Conservation Buffers?Design guidelines for buffers,corridors, and greenways. Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS?109. Asheville, NC: U.S.Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station. 110 p.
http://www.srs.fs.usda.gov/pubs/33522

Bentrup, G. 2009. Creatively communicating conservation complexity. In: Gold, M.A. and M.M. Hall, eds. Agroforestry Comes of Age: Putting Science into Practice. Proceedings, 11th North American Agroforestry Conference, Columbia, MO., May 31-June 3, 2009. 265-272.

Bentrup, G.; Schoeneberger, M.; Wight B. 2009. Riparian forest buffers: Building a sustainable bioenergy future. In: Gold, M.A. and M.M. Hall, eds. Agroforestry Comes of Age: Putting Science into Practice. Proceedings, 11th North American Agroforestry Conference, Columbia, MO., May 31-June 3, 2009. 119-127.

Bradford, Mark A.; DeVore, Jayna L.; Maerz, John C.; McHugh, Joseph V.; Smith, Cecil L.; Strickland, Michael S. 2009. Native, insect herbivore communities derive a significant proportion of their carbon from a widespread invader of forest understories. Biological Invasions. Doi: 10.1007/s10530-009-9480-x.
http://www.srs.fs.usda.gov/pubs/33892

Bradford, Mark A.; Wallenstein, Matthew D.; Allison, Steven D.; Treseder, Kathleen K.; Frey, Serita D.; Watts, Brian W.; Davies, Christian A.; Maddox, Thomas R.; Melillo, Jerry M.; Mohan, Jacqueline E.; Reynolds, James F. 2009. Decreased mass specific respiration under experimental warming is robust to the microbial biomass method employed. Ecology Letters. 12: E15-E18. doi: 10.1111/j.1461-0248.2009.01332.x
http://www.srs.fs.usda.gov/pubs/33871

Bryant, M.D. 2009. Global climate change and potential effects on pacific salmonids in freshwater ecosystems of southeast Alaska. Climatic Change 95:169-193.
http://www.srs.fs.usda.gov/pubs/33399

Bryant, M.D., and R.D. Woodsmith. 2009. The response of salmon populations to geomorphic measurements at three scales. North American Journal of Fisheries Management 29:549-559.
http://www.srs.fs.usda.gov/pubs/33832

Chamberlain, J., 2009. Farming the forests of Appalachia: Opportunities and challenges. In: Gold, M.A. and M.M. Hall, eds. Agroforestry Comes of Age: Putting Science into Practice. Proceedings, 11th North American Agroforestry Conference, Columbia, MO., May 31-June 3, 2009. p. 215-223.

Chamberlain, J.L.; Mitchell, D.; Brigham, T.; Hobby, T.;Zabek, L.; Davis, J. 2009. Forest farming practices. North American Agroforestry: An Intergrated Science and Practice, 2nd edition 38 p.
http://www.srs.fs.usda.gov/pubs/34106

Chamberlain, James; Winn, Matt; Hammett, A.L. (Tom) 2009. Connecting non-timber forest products stakeholders to information and knowledge: A case study of an Internet web site. General Technical Report SRS-116. Hot Springs, Arkansas: USDA-Forest Service, Southern Research Station.
http://www.srs.fs.usda.gov/pubs/33420

Chamblee, John F.; Dehring, Carolyn A.; Depken, Craig A. 2009. Watershed development restrictions and land prices: Empirical evidence from southern Appalachia. Regional Science and Urban Economics. 39: 287-296.
http://www.srs.fs.usda.gov/pubs/33868

Champlin, Tracey B.; Kilgo, John C.; Gumpertz, Marcia L.; Moorman, Christopher E. 2009. Avian response to microclimate in canopy gaps in a bottomland hardwood forest. Southeastern Naturalist. 8(1): 107-120.
http://www.srs.fs.usda.gov/pubs/33663

Champlin, Tracey B.; Kilgo, John C.; Moorman, Christopher E. 2009. Food abundance does not determine bird use of early-successional habitat. Ecology, Vol. 90(6): 1586-1594
http://www.srs.fs.usda.gov/pubs/33054

Choi, Byoungkoo, Andrew W. Ezell, Janet C. Dewey. 2009. Headwater hydrologic functions in the Upper Gulf Coastal Plain of Mississippi. Southeastern Natural Resources Graduate Student Symposium, Mississippi State University, College of Forest Resources, Mississippi State, February 25-27, 2009. [Published Abstract]

Coyle, David R.; Coleman, Mark D.; Aubrey, Doug P. 2008. Above- and below- ground biomass accumulation, production, and distribution of sweetgum and loblolly pine grown with irrigation and fertilization. Canadian Journal of Forest Resource. 38: 1335-1348. doi:10.1139/X07-231.

Dai, Zhaohua; Amatya, Devendra M.; Sun, Ge; Li, Changsheng; Trettin, Carl C.; Li, Harbin. 2008. Modeling the effect of land use change on hydrology of a forested watershed in coastal South Carolina. In: Proceedings of the 2008 South Carolina Water Resources conference, October 14-15, 2008. Charleston, SC.
http://www.srs.fs.usda.gov/pubs/33891

David T. Shoch, Gary Kaster, Aaron Hohl and Ray Souter. 2009. Carbon storage of bottomland hardwood afforestation in the Lower Mississippi Valley, U.S.A. WETLANDS, Vol. 29, No. 2, June 2009, pp. 535?542.
http://www.srs.fs.usda.gov/pubs/33713

Davis, Joseph B. 2008. Quantifying the decline in transpiration of Tsuga Canadensis and predicting water budget implications of succession in southern Appalachian forests. Highlands Biological Station. 8-22 p.
http://www.srs.fs.usda.gov/pubs/33968

Davis, Justin Charles. 2009. Effect of coarse woody debris manipulation on soricid and herpetofaunal communities in upland pine stands of the southeastern coastal plain. Athens, GA: The University of Georgia. 82 p. M.S. thesis.

Delaney, D. A., M. D. Meixner, N. M. Schiff and W.S. Sheppard. 2009. Genetic characterization of commercial honey bee (Hymenoptera: Apidae) populations in the United States by using mitochondrial and microsatellite markers. Annals of the Entomological Society of America 102:666-673.
http://www.srs.fs.usda.gov/pubs/33723

Devall, Margaret S. 2008. Effect of global climate change on rare trees and shrubs. Unasylva 60:29.
http://www.srs.fs.usda.gov/pubs/33836

Devall, Margaret S., Sutherland, Elaine K. 2008. Papers from the 7th International Conference on Dendrochronology ?Cultural Diversity, Environmental Variability. Dendrochronologia 26(3):143-144.

Dey, D.C.; Gardiner, E.S.; Kabrick, J.M.; Stanturf, J.A.; Jacobs, D.F. 2009. Innovations in afforestation of agricultural bottomlands to restore native forests in the United States. In: Ciccarese, L.; Ferreira, R.; Simeone, M.C., compilers, Innovation and new horizons in tree nursery stock production and forest restoration ? from research to business. EC-IUFRO International Conference. Rome, Italy. p.41. (Abstract)

Dobbs, J.A. and D.W. Held. 2008. Where have the whiteflies gone?: Outbreak and decline of Tetraleurodes perileuca on live oaks following Hurricane Katrina. 2008 Entomological Society of America Annual Meeting, Reno, NV, November 13-19, 2008. [Abstract published on-line]

Dobbs, J.A., D.W. Held, and T.E. Nebeker. 2006. Recovery of live oaks and associated arthropods following Hurricane Katrina. 2006 Entomological Society of America Annual Meeting, Indianapolis, IN, December 10-13, 2006. [Abstract published on-line]

Dobbs, J.A., D.W. Held, and T.E. Nebeker. 2007. What impact did storm surge from Hurricane Katrina have on fire ants in coastal Mississippi? 2007. Entomological Society of America Annual Meeting, San Diego, CA, December 6-12, 2007. [Poster]

Dosskey, M. 2009. Planning and design aspects for multifunction riparian zones. In: Proceedings of the Conference Amenagement d?une zone riveraine multifontionnelle Poun une plus grande biodiversite en milieu agricole, Le jeudi 19 mars 2009, Quebec, Canada. 15-24.

Dosskey, M. 2009. Vegetative buffers and targeting in watersheds. Proceedings of the Conference From Dust Bowl to Mud Bowl: Sedimentation, Conservation Measures and the Future of Reservoirs, September 14-16, 2009, Kansas City, MO. 34.

Dunham, Jason B.; Rosenberger, Amanda E.; Thurow, Russell F.; Dolloff, C. Andrew; Howell, Philip J. 2009. Coldwater fish in wadeable streams. In: Bonar, Scott A.; Hubert Wayne A.; Willis, David W., eds. Standard methods for sampling North American freshwater fishes. Bethesda, MD, American Fisheries Society. 119-138. Chapter 8.

Dyer, James M. 2009. Assessing topographic patterns in moisture use and stress using a water balance approach. Landscape Ecology. 24: 391-403. DOI: 10.1007/s10980-008-9316-6
http://www.srs.fs.usda.gov/pubs/33869

Eggert, S.L.: Wallace, J. B. 2007. Wood biofilm as a food resource for stream detritivores. Limnology and Oceanography, Inc. 52(3): 1239-1245.

Eisenbies, M.H., E.D. Vance, W.M. Aust, and J.R. Seiler. 2009. Intensive utilization of harvest residues for bioenergy in southern pine plantations: Quantities available and implications for nutrient budgets and sustainable site productivity. Bioenergy Research. 10.1007/s12155-009-9036-z.

Elliott, K.; Swank, W.T. 2009. Long-term vegetation changes in Coweeta Basin, Southern Appalachian mountains, a USDA, Forest Service Experimental Forest. [Abstract] In: Seventh North American Forest Ecology Workshop 2009. Logan, Utah: 23 p.

Elliott, Katherine J.; Vose, James M.; White, Alan S. 2008. Pine regeneration following wildland fire. In: Olberding, Susan D., and Moore, Margaret M., tech coords. Fort Valley Experimental Forest - A Century of Research 1908-2008. Conference Proceedings; August 7-9, 2008; Flagstaff, AZ. Proceedings RMRS-P-53CD. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 222-230.
http://www.srs.fs.usda.gov/pubs/33803

Fissore, C.; Giardina, C.P.; Kolka, R.; Trettin, C. 2009. Soil Organic Carbon Quality in Forested Mineral Wetlands in North America. Soil Biology and Biochemistry 41: 458-466.

Ford, Chelcy; Hubbard, Robert M.; Kloeppel, Brian D.; Vose, James M. 2008. Diurnal and seasonal variation in canopy transpiration among evergreen and deciduous species. [Abstract] In: The 93rd ESA Annual Meeting. Milwakee, WI: Ecological Society of America.

Foth, Justyn; Kaminski, Richard M.; Straub, Jacob N.; Leach, Alan G.; Leininger, Theodor D. 2009. Aquatic macroinvertebrates in hardwood bottomlands in the Mississippi Alluvial Valley. The 5th North American Duck Symposium, Toronto, Ontario. August 17-21, 2009. [Published Extended Abstract and Poster]

Fraterrigo, Jennifer M.; Pearson, Scott M.; Turner, Monica G. 2008. Joint effects of habitat configuration and temporal stochasticity on population dynamics. Landscape Ecology. 24(7): 863-877. doi: 10.1007/s10980-009-9364-6.

Fraterrigo, Jennifer M.; Pearson, Scott M.; Turner, Monica G. 2009. The response of understory herbaceous plants to nitrogen fertilization in forests of different land-use history. Forest Ecology and Management. 257: 2182-2188. doi: 10.1016/j.foreco.2009.02.036.

Frost, Christopher John. 2005. Direct and indirect effects of insect herbivores on terrestrial ecosystem processes. Athens, GA: University of Georgia. 222 p. Ph. D. dissertation.

Gardiner, E.; Stanturf, J.; Leininger, T.; Hamel, P.; Dorris, L. Jr.; Portwood, J.; Shepard, J. 2008. Establishing a research and demonstration area initiated by managers: the Sharkey Restoration Research and Demonstration Site. Journal of Forestry 106:363-369.
http://www.srs.fs.usda.gov/pubs/33717

Gardiner, E.S.; Jacobs, D.F.; Overton, R.P.; Hernandez, G. 2009. Root-collar diameter and third-year survival of three bottomland hardwoods planted on former agricultural fields in the Lower Mississippi Alluvial Valley. In: Dumroese, R.K; Riley, L.E., tech. Cords. 2009. National Proceedings: Forest and Conservation Nursery Associations-2008. Proc. RMRS-P-58. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station: 85-89.
http://www.srs.fs.usda.gov/pubs/33716

Gardiner, E.S.; O?Brien, J.J.; LŲf, M.; Stanturf, J.A.; Madsen, P. 2009. Photosynthetic characteristics of Fagus sylvatica and Quercus robur established for stand conversion from Picea abies. Forest Ecology and Management 258: 868?878.
http://www.srs.fs.usda.gov/pubs/34036

Goodman, Rosa C.; Jacobs, Douglass F.; Apostol, Kent G.; Wilson, Barrett C.; Gardiner, Emile S. 2009. Winter variation in physiological status of cold stored and freshly lifted semi-evergreen quercus nigra seedlings. Ann. For. Sci. 66:103-111.
http://www.srs.fs.usda.gov/pubs/33498

Grace, J.M., III; Clinton, B.D. 2007. Protecting soil and water in forest road management. American Society of Agriculture and Biological Engineers. 50(5): 1579-1584.
http://www.srs.fs.usda.gov/pubs/33747

Green, E. S. and N. M. Schiff. 2009. Biodiversity of Dahomey National Wildlife Refuge. Jamie Whitten Delta States Research Center Earth Day 22 April 2009. Stoneville, MS. [Poster]

Greenwood, Jennifer L.; Rosemond Amy D. 2005. Periphyton response to long-term nutrient enrichment in a shaded headwater stream. Canadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences. 62(9): 2033-2045. doi: 10.1139/F05-117
http://www.srs.fs.usda.gov/pubs/33746

Greenwood, Jennifer L.; Rosemond Amy D.; Wallace, J. Bruce; Cross, Wayatt F.; Weyers, Holly S. 2007. Nutrients stimulate leaf breakdown rates and detritivore biomass: bottom-up effects via heterotrophic pathways. Oecologic. 151: 637-649. DOI 10.1007/s00442-006-0609-7.
http://www.srs.fs.usda.gov/pubs/33894

Haag, Wendell R. 2009. Extreme longevity in freshwater mussels revisited: sources of bias in age estimates derived from mark-recapture experiments. Freshwater Biology, Vol. 54: 1474-1486.
http://www.srs.fs.usda.gov/pubs/33528

Haag, Wendell R. 2009. Past and future patterns of freshwater mussel extinctions in North America during the Holocene. Pages 107-128 in: S. Turvey, editor, Holocene Extinctions. Oxford University Press.
http://www.srs.fs.usda.gov/pubs/33909

Haag, Wendell R. 2009. Review of Freshwater Mussel Ecology: A Multifactor Approach to Distribution and Abundance by D.L. Strayer, 2008. University of California Press, Berkeley. 204p. Conservation Biology 23:504-506.

Hales, T.C.; Ford, C.R.; Hwang, T.; Vose, J.M.; Band, L.E. 2009. Topographic and ecologic controls on root reinforcement. Journal of Geophysical Research. 114, F03013, doi:10.1029/2008JF001168
http://www.srs.fs.usda.gov/pubs/33750

Hall, Robert O., Jr.; Tank, Jennifer L.; Sobota, Daniel J.; Mulholland, Patrick J.; O?Brien, Jonathan M.; Dodds, Walter K.; Webster, Jackson R.; Vallett, H. Maurice; Poole, Geoffrey C.; Peterson, Bruce J.; Meyer, Judy L.; McDowell, William H.; Johnson, Sherri L.; Hamilton, Stephen K.; Grimm, Nancy B.; Gregory, Stanley V.; Dahm, Clifford N.; Cooper, Lee W.; Ashkenas, Linda R.; Thomas, Suzanne M.; Sheibley, Richard W.; Potter, Jody D.; Niederlehner, B.R.; Johnson, Laura T.; Helton, Ashley M.; Crenshaw, Chelsea M.; Burgin, Amy J.; Bernot, Melody J.; Beaulieu, Jake J.; Arango, Clay P. 2009. Nitrate removal in stream ecosystems measured by 15N addition experiments: total uptake. Limnology and Oceanography. 54(3): 653-665.

Hamel, Paul B. 2008. On the importance of the Cerulean and Golden-winged Warblers summits in the National Federation of Coffee Growers of Colombia in BogotŠ. BioCarta 13, p.4. Cenicafe, Manizales, Colombia, online version.
http://www.srs.fs.usda.gov/pubs/33834

Hamel, Paul B. 2009. Working on behalf of Cerulean Warblers. Jack-pine warbler 86(3):6-7.
http://www.srs.fs.usda.gov/pubs/33841

Hamel, Paul. 2008. A day in the field. The Habitat 25(1):14-15.
http://www.srs.fs.usda.gov/pubs/33835

Hamel, Paul. 2008. Luring in Cerulean Warblers, honoring the volunteer spirit. The Habitat 25(1):13-14.
http://www.srs.fs.usda.gov/pubs/33837

Hamel, Paul. 2009. Washington County (South), Mississippi, 109th Christmas Bird Count. Online publication on Christmas Bird Count website, http://cbc.audubon.org/cbccurrent/current_table.html.

Hammett, A. L. (Tom); Chamberlain, Jim; Winn, Matt. 2009. Finding effective ways to provide knowledge to forest managers about non-timber forest products: a case-study of distance learning approaches. Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS-116. Asheville, NC: 215-222.
http://www.srs.fs.usda.gov/pubs/33791

Hansen, M.H.; Chamberlain, J.; Moser, W.K.; 2009. Nontimber Forest Products. In: Smith, W. Brad, tech. coord.; Miles, Patrick D., data coord.; Perry, Charles H., map coord.; Pugh, Scott A., Data CD coord. 2009. Forest Resources of the United States, 2007. Gen. Tech. Rep. WO-78. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Washington Office. 336 p

Hawkins, Tracy S.; Gardiner, Emile S.; Comer, Greg S. 2009. Modeling the relationship between extractable chlorophyll and SPAD-502 readings for endangered plant species research. Journal for Nature Conservaiton 17:125-129.
http://www.srs.fs.usda.gov/pubs/33726

Hawkins, Tracy S.; Schiff, Nathan M.; Leininger, Theodor D.; Gardiner, Emile S; Devall, Margaret S.; Hamel, Paul B.; Wilson, A. Dan; Connor, Kristina F. 2009. Growth and intraspecific competitive abilities of the dioecious Lindera melissifolia (Lauraceae) in varied flooding regimes. Journal of the Torrey Botanical Society, Vol. 136(1):91-101.
http://www.srs.fs.usda.gov/pubs/32919

Hawkins, Tracy S.; Skojac, Daniel A., Jr.; Lockhart, Brian R.; Leininger, Theodor D.; Devall, Margaret S.; Shiff, Nathan M. 2009. Bottomland Forests in the Lower Mississippi Alluvial Valley associated with the endangered Lindera melissifolia. Castanea 74(2):105-113.
http://www.srs.fs.usda.gov/pubs/33725

Hazelton, P.D.; Grossman, G.D. 2009. Turbidity, velocity an interspecific interactions affect foragin behaviour of rosyside dace (Clinostomus funduloides) and yellowfin shiners (Notropis lutippinis). Ecology of Freshwater. 18: 427-436. DOI: 10.1111/j.1600-0633.2009.00359.x
http://www.srs.fs.usda.gov/pubs/33900

Hazelton, Peter D.; Grossman, Gray D. 2009. The effects of turbidity and an invasive species on foraging success of roseyside dace (Clinostomus funduloides). Freshwater Biology. 54: 1977-1989. doi.:10.1111/j.1365-2427.2009.02248.x
http://www.srs.fs.usda.gov/pubs/33866

Horton, Rebecca, Mitch Weegman, Richard Kaminski, Andrew Ezell, Guiming Wang, Theodor Leininger, and Kenneth Reinecke. 2008. Estimating and modeling acorn abundance in the Mississippi Alluvial Valley. Southeastern Natural Resources Graduate Student Symposium, Mississippi State University, College of Forest Resources, Mississippi State, March 26-28, 2008. [Published Abstract]

Iles, J.C. 2008. A stand level growth and yield model for red oak/sweetgum forests in southern bottomlands. Mississippi State, MS: Mississippi State University. 67 p. M.S. thesis.

Jennings, J.T., A.D. Austin and N. M. Schiff. 2009. The Australian endemic woodwasp genus Austrocyrta Riek (Hymenoptera: Xiphydriidae). Australian Journal of Entomology 48: 29?35.
http://www.srs.fs.usda.gov/pubs/33724

John L. Nelson, Charles M. Ruffner, John W. Groninger and Ray A. Souter 2008. Drainage and Agriculture Impacts on Fire Frequency in a Southern Illinois Forested Bottomland. Can. J. For. Res. 38: 2932-2941
http://www.srs.fs.usda.gov/pubs/33714

Johnson, Brent J.; Wallace, J. Bruce.; Rosemond, AmyD.; Cross, Wyatt F. 2006. Larval salamander growth responds to enrichment of a nutrient poor headwater stream. Hydrobiologia. 573: 272-232. DOI 10.1007/s10750-006-0272-3
http://www.srs.fs.usda.gov/pubs/33902

Johnson, D.W.; Todd, D.E., Jr.; Trettin, C.F.; Mulholland, P.J. 2008. Decadal changes in potassium, calcium, and magnesium in a deciduous forest soil. Soil Science Society of America Journal 72: 1795 ? 1805.
http://www.srs.fs.usda.gov/pubs/33966

Johnson, S.L.; Adams, M.B.; Amatya, D.M.; Bailey, S.W.; Rhoades, C.C.; Jones, J.B.; Knoepp, J.D.; McCaughey, W; McDowell, W.H.; McGuire, K.J.; Sebestyen, S.D.; Wohlgemuth, P.M. 2009. Stream nutrient responses to forest harvest and disturbance: lessons from long-term research at USFS Experimental Forests. [Abstract] In: Seventh North American Forest Ecology Workshop. [Logan, Utah]: Utah State University:

Johnson, S.L.; Sebestyen, S.D.; Adams, M.; Amatya, D.M.; Bailey, S.W.; Jones, J.B.; Knoepp, J.D.; McCaughey, W.; McDowell, W.H.; McGuire, K.J.; Rhoades, C.C.; Wohlegmuth, P.M.2008. Long-term water quality and stream nutrient responses to forest harvest and disturbance at US Forest Service Experimental Forests and Ranges. [Abstract] In: American Geophysical Union fall meeting 2008. San Francisco, CA: American Geophysical Union.

Jones, Benjamin C.; Kleitch, Jennifer L.; Harper, Craig A.; Buehler, David A. 2008. Ruffed grouse brood habitat use in a mixed hardwood forest: implications for forest management in the Appalachians. Forest Ecology and Management. 255: 3580-3588. doi: 10.1016/j.foreco.2008.02.019
http://www.srs.fs.usda.gov/pubs/33861

Kilgo, John C. 2009. Coyotes in the east: are they impacting deer?. Forest Landowner: 5-8
http://www.srs.fs.usda.gov/pubs/32996

Kilgo, John C. 2009. Impact of coyotes on fawn survival in South Carolina. In: 32nd annual Southeast deer study group meeting. Herds without hunters: the future of deer management? Roanoke, VA:

Kirk, Ryan William. 2009. Land use and terrestrial carbon storage in western North Carolina from 1850-2030: A historical reconstruction and simulation study. St. Paul, MN: University of Minnesota. 167p. Ph.D. dissertation.

Knoepp, Jennifer D.; Clinton, Barton D. 2009. Riparian zones in southern Appalachian headwater catchments: Carbon and nitrogen responses to forest cutting. Forest Ecology and Management. doi: 10.1016/j.foreco.2009.04.006. In Press.
http://www.srs.fs.usda.gov/pubs/33748

Knoepp, Jennifer D.; Elliott, Katherine J.; Clinton, Barton D.; Vose, James M. 2009. Effects of prescribed fire in mixed oak forests of the southern Appalachians: forest floor, soil, and soil solution nitrogen responses. Journal of Torrey Botanical Society. 136(3): 380-391.
http://www.srs.fs.usda.gov/pubs/33745

Knoepp, Jennifer D.; Vose, James M.; Clinton, Barton D.; Hunter, Mark D. 2009. Impacts of hemlock woolly adelgid infestation and hemlock mortality on nutrient cycling pools and processes in riparian ecosystems of the southern Appalachians. [Abstract] In: 2nd International Conference on Forests and Water in a Changing Environment. Raleigh, NC: USDA, Forest Service, Southern Research Station.

Kominoski, John S.; Pringle, Catherine M. 2008. Resource-consumer diversity: testing the effects of leaf litter species diversity on stream macroinvertebrate communities. Freshwater Biology. 54: 1461-1473. doi:10.1111/j.1365-2427.2009.02196.x
http://www.srs.fs.usda.gov/pubs/33899

Kominoski, John S.; Hoellein, Timothy J.; Kelly John J.; Pringle, Catherine M. 2009. Does mixing litter of different qualities alter stream microbial diversity and functioning on individual litter species? Oikos. 118: 457-463. doi: 10.1111/j.1600-0706.2008.17222.x

Kominoski, John Stephen. 2008. Linking resource and consumer diversity to ecosystem function in a detritus-based watershed. Athens, GA: University of Georgia. 195 p. Ph.D. dissertation.

La Torre Torres, Ileana B.; Amatya, Devendra M.; Callahan, Timothy J. 2008. Interpreting historical streamflow data from a third-order Coastal Plain watershed: runoff response to storm events. In: Proceedings of the 2008 South Carolina Water Resources conference, October 14-15, 2008. Charleston, SC.
http://www.srs.fs.usda.gov/pubs/34011

Leach, Alan G.; Straub, Jacob N.; Kaminski, Richard M.; Ezell, Andrew W.; Foth, Justyn; Leininger, Theodor D.; Reinecke, Kenneth J. 2009. Red Oak Acorn Production and Abundance in the Mississippi Alluvial Valley. The 5th North American Duck Symposium, Toronto, Ontario. August 17-21, 2009. [Published Extended Abstract and Poster]

Leininger, T.D.; Schiff, N.M., and Tidwell, C. 2008. Delta Experimental Forest. Southern Research Station, Leadership Team Meeting, Asheville, NC. October 15-17, 2008 and at the 15th Biennial Southern Silvicultural Research Conference, Little Rock, AR, November 17-20, 2008. [Poster]

Lemly, A. Dennis. 2009. Aquatic hazard of selenium pollution from coal mining. In: Fosdyke, Gerald B. ed. Coal Mining: Research, Technology and Safety. 167-183. Chapter 6. Nova Science Publishers, Inc. 17p.
http://www.srs.fs.usda.gov/pubs/33826

Li, Harbin; Wang, Zhengquan. 2008. Fine root population simulator to determine critical factors in estimating root turnover. [Poster] In: The 93rd ESA Annual Meeting. Milwakee, WI: Ecological Society of America.

Lockhart, Brian R.; Gardiner, Emile S.; Dey, Daniel C. (editors). 2008. Tenth workshop on seedling physiology and growth problems in oak plantings. Gen. Tech. Rep. NRS-P-32. Newton Square, PA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Northern Research Station: 18 p.
http://www.srs.fs.usda.gov/pubs/33818

Lockhart, Brian R.; Gardiner, Emile S.; Leininger, Theodor D.; Stanturf, John A. 2008. A conceptual model for developing mixed-species plantations in the Lower Mississippi Alluvial Valley. In: Lockhart, Brian R.; Gardiner, Emile S.; Dey, Daniel C., ed. Tenth workshop on seedling physiology and growth problems in oak plantings. Gen. Tech. Rep. NRS-P-32. Newton Square, PA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Northern Research Station: 6.(Abstract)

Lockhart, Brian Roy 2009. Timber and forest birds. Journal of Forestry 66(5):404.
http://www.srs.fs.usda.gov/pubs/32577

Lockhart, Brian Roy; Gardiner, Emile S.; Dey, Daniel C. 2008. Tenth workshop on seedling physiology and growth problems in oak plantings. Gen. Tech. Rep. NRS-P-32. Newtown Square, PA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Northern Research Station. 18 p.
http://www.srs.fs.usda.gov/pubs/18946

Lockhart, Brian Roy; Gardiner, Emile S.; Hodges, John D.; Ezell, Andrew W. 2008. Carbon allocation and morphology of cherrybark oak seedlings and sprouts under three light regimes. Ann. For. Sci. 64:801p1-801p8.
http://www.srs.fs.usda.gov/pubs/31873

Lockhart, Brian Roy; Gardiner, Emile; Leininger, Theodor; Stanturf, John 2008. A stand-development approach to oak afforestation in the lower Mississippi alluvial valley. South J. Appl. For., Vol. 32(3):120-129.
http://www.srs.fs.usda.gov/pubs/30765

Marion, Daniel A.; Phillips, Jonathan D.; Turkington, Alice V. 2008. Dendrologic effects on soil evolution timescales and system behavior in the Ouachita Mountains, USA. American Geophysical Union 2008 Fall Meeting. [Published abstract]

Martins, Andreza, Abilio, Fernanda, Smith, C.G. III, Tidwell, C., Hamel, P., Devall, M., Connor, K., Leininger, T., Wilson, A.D. 2009. Pondberry (Lindera melissifolia Walt. Blume) seed and seedling predators. Botany & Mycology 2009:101. [Published abstract]

Maynard, Erynn and Stephen Brewer. 2009. Restoring little bluestem and broomsedge to upland forests in northern Mississippi. 2009 Meeting of the Society for Ecological Restoration, Southeastern Chapter, March 24, 2009, Auburn, Alabama. [Published Abstract]

Miller, Debra Lee; Schrecengost, Joshua; Merrill, Anita; Kilgo, John; Ray, H. Scott; Miller, Karl V.; Baldwin, Charles A. 2009. Hematology, Parasitology, and Serology of Free Ranging Coyotes (Canis latreans) from South Carolina. Journal of Wildlife Diseases. 45(3): 863-869.
http://www.srs.fs.usda.gov/pubs/33878

Mitchell, Robert; Engstrom, Todd; Sharitz, Rebecca R.; De Steven, Diane; Hiers, Kevin; Cooper, Robert; Kirkman, L. Katherine. 2009. old forests and endangered woodpeckers:old-growth in the Southern Coastal Plain. Natural Areas Journal 29:301-310.
http://www.srs.fs.usda.gov/pubs/33819

Moseley, Kurtis R.; Owens, Audrey K.; Castleberry, Steven B.; Ford, W. Mark; Kilgo, John C.; McCay, Timothy S. 2008. Soricid response to coarse woody debris manipulations in Coastal Plain loblolly pine forests. Forest Ecology and Management. 225: 2306-2311.
http://www.srs.fs.usda.gov/pubs/33865

Mulholland, Patrick J.; Hall, Robert O., Jr.; Sobota, Daniel J.; Dodds, Walter K.; Findlay, Stuart E.G.; Grimm, Nancy B.; Hamilton, Stephen K.; McDowell, William H.; O?Brien, Jonathan M.; Tank, Jennifer L.; Ashkenas, Linda R.; Cooper, Lee W.; Dahm Clifford N.; Gregory, Stanley V.; Johnson, Sherri L.; Meyer, Judy L.; Peterson, Bruce J.; Poole, Geoffrey C.; Valett, H. Maurice; Webster, Jackson R.; Arango, Clay P.; Beaulieu, Jake J.; Bernot, Melody J.; Burgin, Amy J.; Crenshaw, Chelsea L.; Helton, Ashley M.; Johnson, Laura T.; Niederlehner, B.R.; Potter, Jody D.; Sheibley, Richard W.; Thomas, Suzanne M. 2009. Nitrate removal in stream ecosystems measured by 15N addition experiments: denitrification. Limnology and Oceanography. 54(3): 666-680.
http://www.srs.fs.usda.gov/pubs/33738

Murray, Brian; Jenkins, Aaron; Kramer, Randall; Faulkner, Stephen P. 2009. Valuing ecosystem services from wetlands restoration in the Mississippi Alluvial Valley. Durham, NC. Nicholas Institute for Environmental Policy Solutions.

Nedlo, Jason E; Martin, Timothy A.; Vose, James M.; Teskey, Robert O. 2009. Growing season temperatures limit growth of loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) seedlings across a wide geographic transect. Tree. DOI 10.1007/s00468-009-0317-0.
http://www.srs.fs.usda.gov/pubs/33870

Newman, Amanda Carla. 2008. Restoration of shortleaf pine (Pinus Echinata Mill) ? Bluestem (Andropogon Gerardii Vitman and Schizachyrium Scoparium (Michx.) Nash) communities in the southern Appalachians. Athens, GA: University of Georgia. 105 p. M.S. thesis.

Nuckolls, April E.; Wurzburger, Nina; Ford, Chelcy R.; Hendrick, Ronald L.; Vose, James M.; Kloeppel, Brian D. 2008. Hemlock declines rapidly with hemlock woolly adelgid infestation: impacts on the carbon cycle of the Southern Appalachian forests. Ecosystems: 1-12
http://www.srs.fs.usda.gov/pubs/31854

O?Keefe, Joy M.; Loeb, Susan C.; Lanham, J. Drew; Hill, Hoke S., Jr. 2009. Macrohabitat factors affect day roost selection by eastern read bats and eastern pipistrelles in the southern Appalachian Mountains, USA. Forest Ecology and Management. 257: 1757-1763.
http://www.srs.fs.usda.gov/pubs/33805

Oswalt, C.M.; Larsen, D.R. 2008. Integrating a wood quality component with the Sylvan Stand Structure Model for comparing cherrybark oak plantation management scenarios. In: Lockhart, B.R.; Gardiner, E.S.; Dey, D.C. ed. Tenth workshop on seedling physiology and growth problems in oak plantings. Gen. Tech. Rep. NRS-P-32. Newtown Square, PA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Northern Research Station: p.6. [Published abstract]

Oswalt, Christopher M.; Oswalt, Sonja N.; Johnson, Tony G.; Chamberlain, James L.; Randolph, KaDonna C.; Coulston, John W. 2009. Tennessee's Forests, 2004. Resour. Bull. SRS?144. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service, Southern Research Station. 96 p.
http://www.srs.fs.usda.gov/pubs/32506

Owens, Audrey K.; Moseley, Kurtis R.; McCay, Timothy S.; Castleberry, Steven B.; Kilgo, John C.; Ford, W. Mark. 2008. Amphibian and reptile community response to coarse woody debris manipulations in upland loblolly pine (Pinus taeda) forests. Forest Ecology and Management. 256: 2078-2083.

Pangle, Luke; Vose, James M.; Teskey, Robert O. 2009. Radiation use efficiency in adjacent hardwood and pine forests in the southern Appalachians. Forest Ecology and Management. 257: 1034-1042. doi: 10.1016/j.foreco.2008.11.004.
http://www.srs.fs.usda.gov/pubs/33897

Petty, J. Todd; Grossman, Gary D. 2007. Size-dependent territoriality of mottled sculpin in a southern Appalachian stream. Transactions of the American Fisheries Society. 136: 1750-1761. DOI: 10.1577/T06-034.1
http://www.srs.fs.usda.gov/pubs/33862

Phillips, Jonathan D.; Marion, Daniel A.; Turkington, Alice V. 2008. Pedologic and geomorphic impacts of a tornado blowdown event in a mixed pine-hardwood forest. Catena 75:278-287.
http://www.srs.fs.usda.gov/pubs/31428

Plague, Gordon R.; Wallace, J. Bruce; Grubaugh, Jack W. 1998. Linkages between trophic variability and distribution of Pteronarcys spp. (Plecoptera: Pteronarcyidae) along a stream continuum. American Midland Naturalist. 139(2): 224-234. doi: 10.1674/0003-0031(1998)
http://www.srs.fs.usda.gov/pubs/33890

Powers, Steven L.; Warren, Melvin L, Jr. 2009. Phylogeography of three snubnose darters (Percidae: subgenus Ulocentra) endemic to the southeastern U.S. Coastal Plain. Copeia 2009:526-531.
http://www.srs.fs.usda.gov/pubs/33842

Qualls, Robert G.; Takiyama, Akiko; Wershaw, Robert L. 2003. Formation and loss of humic substances during decomposition in a pine forest floor. Soil Science Society of America Journal. 67: 899-909.
http://www.srs.fs.usda.gov/pubs/33875

Read, Quentin D. 2008. Soil and tree ring chemistry changes in an oak forest. Highlands Biological Station. 56-65 pp.
http://www.srs.fs.usda.gov/pubs/33864

Riscassi, Amy L.; Scanlon, Todd M. 2009. Nitrate variability in hydrological flow paths for three mid-Appalachian forested watersheds following a large-scale defoliation. Journal of Geophysical Research. 114: G02009, doi: 10.1029/2008JG000860.
http://www.srs.fs.usda.gov/pubs/33893

Rosen, David J.; De Steven, Diane; Lange, Michael L. 2008. Conservation strategies and vegetation characterization in the Columbia bottomlands, an under-recognized southern floodplain forest formation. Natural Areas Journal 28(1):74-82.
http://www.srs.fs.usda.gov/pubs/29409

Roy, Allison H.; Rosemond, Amy D.; Leigh, David S.; Paul, Michael J.; Wallace, J. Bruce. 2003. Habitat-specific responses of stream insects to land cover disturbance: biological consequences and monitoring implications. Journal of the North American Benthological Society. 22(2): 292-307.
http://www.srs.fs.usda.gov/pubs/33877

Rypel, Andrew L.; Haag, Wendell R.; Findlay, Robert H. 2009. Pervasive hydrologic effects on freshwater mussels and riparian trees in southeastern floodplain ecosystems. Wetlands, Vol. 29(2): 497-504
http://www.srs.fs.usda.gov/pubs/33529

Rypel, Andrew L.; Haag, Wendell R.; Findlay, Robert H. 2009. Validation of annual growth rings in freshwater mussel shells using cross dating .Can. J. Fish. Aquat. Sci., Vol. 65: 2224-2232.
http://www.srs.fs.usda.gov/pubs/33530

Safdari, Vahidreza; Devall, Margaret S. 2009. Elementary software for the hand lens identification of some common iranian woods. IAWA Journal 30(1):81-86.
http://www.srs.fs.usda.gov/pubs/33526

Schenk, H. Jochen; Espino, Susana; Goedhart, Christine M.; Nordenstahl, Marisa; Cabrera, Hugo I. Martinez; Jones, Cynthia S. 2008. Hydraulic integration and shrub growth form linked across continental aridity gradients. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America. 105(32): 11248-11253. doi:10.1073/pnas.0804294105.
http://www.srs.fs.usda.gov/pubs/33879

Schiff, N. 2009. Don?t tread on me. Delta Wildlife. 17(2): 22.
http://www.srs.fs.usda.gov/pubs/33722

Schofield, K.A.; Pringle, C.M.; Meyer, J.L.; Rosi-Marshall, E.J. 2008. Functional redundancy of stream macroconsumers despite differences in catchment land use. Freshwater Biology. 53: 2857-2599. doi: 10.1111/j.1365-2427.2008.02085.x
http://www.srs.fs.usda.gov/pubs/33876

Schummer, Michael L., Christina Zimmerman, Richard M. Kaminski, Mike Brown, and Charles Wax. 2008. Weather-related indices of dabbling duck (Anas spp.) fall and winter migration through Middle North America. Mississippi Chapter of The Wildlife Society Annual Meeting, Mississippi Museum of Natural Science, Jackson MS October 2-3, 2008. [Abstract]

Schummer, Michael L., Richard M. Kaminski, Charles L. Wax, Mike E. Brown, Christina E. Zimmerman, Andrew H. Raedeke, David A. Graber. 2009. Long-term trend analyses of climatic factors influencing autumn-winter migration by mallards in Central, Mississippi, and Atlantic Flyways. The 5th North American Duck Symposium, Toronto, Ontario. August 17-21, 2009. [Published Extended Abstract]

Sheldon, Andrew L.; Warren, Melvin L., Jr. 2009. Filters and templates: stonefly (Plecoptera) richness in Ouachita Mountains streams, U.S.A. Freshwater Biology 54:943-956.
http://www.srs.fs.usda.gov/pubs/33843

Stanturf, J.A; Gardiner, E.S; Shepard, J.P; Schweitzer, C.J; Portwood, C.J; Dorros, L.C. 2009. Restoration of bottomland hardwood forest across a treatment intensity gradient. Elsevier: Forest Ecology and Mangement 257:1803-1814.
http://www.srs.fs.usda.gov/pubs/34041

Straub, Jacob N.; Leach, Alan; Foth, Justyn; Kaminski, Richard M.; Ezell, Andrew W.; Wang, Guiming; Leininger,Theodor D. 2009. Estimating red oak acorn production and availability in the Mississippi Alluvial Valley. Southern Hardwood Forest Research Group Meeting, Stoneville, MS. February 10, 2009. [Poster]

Straub, Jacob N.; Leach, Alan; Justyn, Foth; Kaminski, RIchard M. 2009. Red oak acorn production and abundance in the Mississippi Alluvial Valley. Southeastern Natural Resources Graduate Student Symposium, Mississippi State University, College of Forest Resources, Mississippi State, February 25-27, 2009. [Published Abstract]

Strickland, Michael S.; Lauber, Christian; Fierer, Noah; Bradford, Mark A. 2009. Testing the functional significance of microbial community composition. Ecology. 90(2): 441-451.
http://www.srs.fs.usda.gov/pubs/33896

Strickland, Michael S.; Osburn, Ernest; Lauber, Christian; Fierer, Noah; Bradford, Mark A. 2009. Litter quality is in the eye of the beholder: initial decomposition rates as a function of inoculum characteristics. Functional Ecology. 23: 627-636. doi: 10.1111/j.1365-2435.2008.01515.x
http://www.srs.fs.usda.gov/pubs/33859

Strickland, Michael Scott. 2009. Ecosystem carbon cycling: relationships to soil microbial community structure. Athens, GA: University of Georgia. 258 p. Ph. D. dissertation.

Sun, Ge: Boggs, Johnny; McNulty, Steven G.; Amatya, Devendra M.; Trettin, Carl C.; Dai, Zhaohua; Vose, James M.; La Torre Torres, Ileana B.; Callahan, Timothy. 2008. Hydrologic processes of forested headwater watersheds across a physiographic gradient in the southeastern United States. In: Proceedings of the 2008 South Carolina Water Resources Conference, October 14-15, 2008, Charleston, SC.
http://www.srs.fs.usda.gov/pubs/34038

Sun, Ge; Zuo, Changqing; Liu, Shiyu; Liu, Mingliang; McNulty, Steven G.; Vose, James M. 2008. Watershed evapotranspiration increased due to changes in vegetation composition and structure under a subtropical climate. Journal of the American Water Resources Association (JAWRA) 44(5): 1164-1175. DOI: 10.1111/j.1752-1688.2008.00241.x
http://www.srs.fs.usda.gov/pubs/33901

Thien, Leonard B.; Bernhardt, Peter; Devall, Margaret S.; Chen, Zhi-Duan; Luo, Yi-bo; Fan, Jian-Hua; Yuan, Liang-Chen; Williams, Joseph H. 2009. Pollination biology of basal angiosperms (ANITA Grade). American Journal of Botany 96(1):1-17.
http://www.srs.fs.usda.gov/pubs/33527

Tiruveedhula, Mohan, Joseph Fan, Ravi R. Sadasivuni, Surya S. Durbha, David L. Evans. 2009. Biomass and health based forest cover delineation using spectral un-mixing. American Society for Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing 2009 Annual Conference, Baltimore, MD, March 9-13, 2009. 11 pp.
http://www.srs.fs.usda.gov/pubs/33833

Tiruveedhula, Mohan, Joseph Fan, Ravi R. Sadasivuni, Surya S. Durbha, David L. Evans. 2009. Estimating the spatial density variation of small diameter trees in Mississippi. Southeastern Natural Resources Graduate Student Symposium, Mississippi State University, College of Forest Resources, Mississippi State, February 25-27, 2009. [Published Abstract]

Trettin, C.; Amatya, D.A.; Dai, Z.; Li, B.; Song G. 2009. Ecosystem resiliency in the southeastern Atlantic Coastal Plain ? perspectives from the Santee Experimental Forest. [Abstract]. In: 7th North American Forest Ecology Workshop. Logan, UT: 56 p.

Trettin, Carl C.; Amatya, Devendra M.; Kaufman, Charles; Levine, Norman; Morgan, Robert T. 2008. Recognizing change in hydrologic functions and pathways due to historical agricultural use ? implications to hydrologic assessments and modeling. In: The third interagency conference on research in the watersheds. September 8-11, 2008. Estes Park, CO. Interagency Conference on Research in the Watersheds (ICRW).
http://www.srs.fs.usda.gov/pubs/33824

Walker, John T.; Vose, James M.; Knoepp, Jennifer; Geron, Christopher D. 2009. Recovery of Nitrogen Pools and Processes in Degraded Riparian Zones in the Southern Appalachians. J. Environ. Qual., Vol. 38, p. 1391‚??1399
http://www.srs.fs.usda.gov/pubs/33324

Walters, D.M.; Roy, A.H.; Leigh, D.S. 2009. Environmental indicators of macroinvertebrate and fish assemblage integrity in urbanizing watersheds. Ecological Indicators. 9: 1222-1233. DOI: 10.1016j.ecolind.2009.02.011
http://www.srs.fs.usda.gov/pubs/33873

Warren, M.L., Jr. 2009. Centrarchid identification and natural history. Pages 375-533 in S. J. Cooke and D. P. Philipp (editors). Centrarchid fishes: diversity, biology, and conservation. Wiley-Blackwell, Chichester, West Sussex, United Kingdom.
http://www.srs.fs.usda.gov/pubs/33889

Warren, M.L., Jr., T.D. Leininger, and J.S. Brewer. 2008. Tallahatchie Experimental Forest. Southern Research Station, Leadership Team Meeting, Asheville, NC. October 15-17, 2008 and at the 15th Biennial Southern Silvicultural Research Conference, Little Rock, AR, November 17-20, 2008. [Poster]

Warren, Melvin L., Jr., A.L. Sheldon, and W.R. Haag. 2009. Constructed microhabitat bundles for sampling fishes and crayfishes in coastal plain streams. North American Journal of Fisheries Management 29:330-342.
http://www.srs.fs.usda.gov/pubs/32993

Warren, Robert J., II. 2007. Linking understory evergreen herbaceous distributions and niche differentiation using habitat-specific demography and experimental common gardens. Athens, GA: University of Georgia. 135 p. Ph. D. dissertation

Warren, Robert J., III. 2008. Mechanisms driving understory evergreen herb distributions across slope aspects: as derived from landscape position. Plant Ecology. 198(2): 297-308. DOI: 10.1007/s11258-008-9406-1.
http://www.srs.fs.usda.gov/pubs/33840

Wilson, A. D.; Baietto, M. 2009. Applications and advances in electronic-nose technologies. Sensors 9(7):5099-5148.
http://www.srs.fs.usda.gov/pubs/33450

Wilson, A. D.; N. M. Schiff; D. A. Haugen, and E. R. Hoebeke. 2009. First report of Amylostereum areolatum in pines in the United States. Plant Disease 93(1):108.
http://www.srs.fs.usda.gov/pubs/33448

Wilson, A. Dan. 2009. The potential of trench inserts for oak wilt suppression. Pp. 201-223 in: The Proceedings of the 2nd National Oak Wilt Symposium. International Society of Arboriculture, June 4-7, 2007. Austin, Texas. David N. Appel and Ronald F. Billings, eds., Insight Printing and Graphic Services, Bryan, TX, 264 p. (Abstract)

Wurzburger, Nina; Hendrick, Ronald L. 2009. Plant litter chemistry and mycorrhizal roots promote a nitrogen feedback in a temperate forest. Journal of Ecology. 97(3): 528-536. DOI: 10.1111/j.1365-2745.2009.01487.x
http://www.srs.fs.usda.gov/pubs/33895

Yamashita, Y.; Kloeppel, B.; Knoepp, J.; Jaffe', R. 2008. Dissolved organic matter composition and dynamics in headwater streams of an eastern deciduous biome under different forest management regimes: applications of EEM-PARAFAC. [Abstract] In: AGU Chapman Conference on Organic Matter Flouorescence. Edgbaston, Birmingham, UK: University of Birmingham. 8 p.

Zimmerman, Christina E. 2009. Long-term trend analysis of climatic factors influencing autumn-winter migration of mallards in the Mississippi Flyway. Mississippi State, MS: Mississippi State University. 57 p. M.S. thesis.

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