Forest Herbicide Benefits and Developments for Intensive Southern Pine Culture

  • Authors: Miller, James H.
  • Publication Year: 1991
  • Publication Series: Miscellaneous Publication
  • Source: In: Stokes, Bryce J.; Rawlins, Cynthia L., eds., Proceedings of the Forestry and Environment Engineering Solutions; 1991 June 5-6; New Orleans, LA. ASAE Publication 09-91. St. Joseph, MI: American Society of Agricultural Engineers. 129-138.

Abstract

Silvicultural treatments that use forest herbicides can accelerate wood production, enhance wildlife and recreational habitats, aid in endangered species recovery, and encourage plants that improve the aesthetics of woodlands. This paper focuses on the benefits of increased wood production derived from competition control for establishing southern pine plantations. Research findings on the benefits of both woody and herbaceous competition control are reviewed and discussed. Since more is known about the economics of woody competition control, compared to herbaceous control, it is given more attention. The appropriate application methods and vegetation control strategies are reviewed along with possible innovations for improving efficiency.

  • Citation: Miller, James H. 1991. Forest Herbicide Benefits and Developments for Intensive Southern Pine Culture. In: Stokes, Bryce J.; Rawlins, Cynthia L., eds., Proceedings of the Forestry and Environment Engineering Solutions; 1991 June 5-6; New Orleans, LA. ASAE Publication 09-91. St. Joseph, MI: American Society of Agricultural Engineers. 129-138.
  • Posted Date: April 1, 1980
  • Modified Date: August 22, 2006
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