Carbon Sequestration in loblolly pine plantations: Methods, limitations, and research needs for estimating storage pools

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Abstract

Globally, the species most widely used for plantation forestry is loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.). Because loblolly pine plantations are so extensive and grow so rapidly, they provide a great potential for sequestering atmospheric carbon (C). Because loblolly pine plantations are relatively simple ecosystems and because such a great volume of knowledge has been gained about the species, the quantification of C dynamics of loblolly pine stands will be relatively easy. Here, we evaluate the state of science that relates to quantifying standing C pools in managed loblolly pine stands. We consider the accuracy and precision with which aboveground and belowground pools can be estimated, the portability of these tools across different stand types, and the intensity and efficacy of the measurement techniques. We emphasize the need to develop standard and relatively inexpensive measurement protocols.

  • Citation: Johnsen, Kurt; Teskey, Bob; Samuelson, Lisa; Butnor, John; Sampson, David; Sanchez, Felipe; Maier, Chris; McKeand, Steve 2004. Carbon Sequestration in loblolly pine plantations: Methods, limitations, and research needs for estimating storage pools. In: Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS–75. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station. Chapter 32. p. 373-381.

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