Fine root respiration in mature eastern white pine (Pinus strobus) in situ: the importance of CO2 in controlled environments.

  • Authors: Clinton, Barton D.; Vose, James M.
  • Publication Year: 1999
  • Publication Series: Miscellaneous Publication
  • Source: Tree Physiology. 19: 475-479.

Abstract

Clinton and Vose measured seasonal fine root respiration rate in situ while controlling chamber temperature and [CO2]. Atmospheric and [CO2] ([CO2]a) and measured soil [CO2] ([CO2]s) were alternately delivered to a cuvette containing intact fine roots of eastern white pine (Pinus strobus L.). Respiration rates were consistently higher in [CO2] [CO2]a than in [CO2]s, and were almost three times higher during midsummer. Respiration rates were immediately reversed after returning to the alternate [CO2] (i.e., [CO2]a ® [CO2]s ® [CO2]a, and vice versa) suggesting a direct effect of elevated [CO2] on apparent respiration. Soil[CO2] -based respiration rates decreased with increasing [CO2] on a dry mass and tissue [N] basis. The authors conclude that estimates of soil CO2 flux and soil carbon budgets may be improved by more completely accounting for the rhizosphere microclimate (i.e., soil temperature and [CO2]s) during measurement of fine root respiration.

  • Citation: Clinton, Barton D.; Vose, James M. 1999. Fine root respiration in mature eastern white pine (Pinus strobus) in situ: the importance of CO2 in controlled environments. Tree Physiology. 19: 475-479.
  • Posted Date: April 1, 1980
  • Modified Date: August 22, 2006
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