Utilization of forest slash to sequester carbon in loblolly pine plantations in the lower coastal plain

  • Authors: Sanchez, F.; Carter, E.A.; Edwards, W.
  • Publication Year: 2002
  • Publication Series: Miscellaneous Publication
  • Source: In: Proceedings of the NETL first national conference on Carbon Sequestration. 14-2017 May 2001, Washington, DC: 22p. www.netl.doegov/publications/proceedings/01/carbon_seq/p52.pdf (no credit)

Abstract

Soil-organic matter (SOM) is a complex array of components including soil fauna and flora at different stages of decomposition (Berg et al., 1982). Its concentration in soils can vary from 0.5% in mineral soils to almost 100% in peat soils (Brady, 1974). Organic matter (OM) in the surface mineral soil is considered a major determinant of forest ecosystem productivity because it affects water retention, soil structure, and nutrient cycling (Powers et al., 1990; Paul 199 1). Soil-organic matter is the major source of nitrogen available to plants and contains as much as 65% of the total soil phosphorus (Bauer and Black, 1994).

  • Citation: Sanchez, F.; Carter, E.A.; Edwards, W. 2002. Utilization of forest slash to sequester carbon in loblolly pine plantations in the lower coastal plain. In: Proceedings of the NETL first national conference on Carbon Sequestration. 14-2017 May 2001, Washington, DC: 22p. www.netl.doegov/publications/proceedings/01/carbon_seq/p52.pdf (no credit)
  • Posted Date: April 1, 1980
  • Modified Date: August 22, 2006
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