Seasonal Sucrose Metabolism in Longleaf Pine Tree Stem Cambial Tissues

This article is part of a larger document. View the larger document here.

  • Authors: Sung, Shi-Jean S.; Otrosina, William J.; Zarnoch, Stanley J.
  • Publication Year: 2004
  • Publication Series: Miscellaneous Publication
  • Source: Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS–71. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station. pp. 492-495

Abstract

This study was a part of a long-term study on factors contributing to the decline of a 40+-year-old longleaf pine stand where prescribed burning has occurred. Burn treatments were implemented between January and March 1997. From April 2002 through February 2003, stem cambial tissues were sampled periodically from healthy longleaf pine trees preselected from each treatment in early April 2002. Sucrose synthase activity increased from April through June but decreased 63 percent from June to July. After several rainstorms in September, the September and October sucrose synthase activity was as high as that of June. The lowest sucrose synthase activity occurred in February. The seasonal pattern of pyrophosphate-dependent phosphofructokinase was similar to that of sucrose synthase. Other measured enzymes in the sucrose metabolic pathway did not show clear seasonal patterns. No treatment effects on these enzyme activities were observed. The seasonal physiological status of longleaf pine trees, as evidenced by their stem cambial sucrose synthase activity, might be useful in determining the optimal time for prescribed burning in longleaf pine stand management.

  • Citation: Sung, Shi-Jean S.; Otrosina, William J.; Zarnoch, Stanley J. 2004. Seasonal Sucrose Metabolism in Longleaf Pine Tree Stem Cambial Tissues. Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS–71. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station. pp. 492-495
  • Posted Date: April 1, 1980
  • Modified Date: August 22, 2006
  • Print Publications Are No Longer Available

    In an ongoing effort to be fiscally responsible, the Southern Research Station (SRS) will no longer produce and distribute hard copies of our publications. Many SRS publications are available at cost via the Government Printing Office (GPO). Electronic versions of publications may be downloaded, printed, and distributed.

    Publication Notes

    • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.
    • Our online publications are scanned and captured using Adobe Acrobat. During the capture process some typographical errors may occur. Please contact the SRS webmaster if you notice any errors which make this publication unusable.
    • To view this article, download the latest version of Adobe Acrobat Reader.