Comparison of Planting Bar and Hoedad Planted Seedlings For Survival and Growth in a Controlled Environment

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  • Authors: Adams, John C.; Patterson, William B.
  • Publication Year: 2004
  • Publication Series: Miscellaneous Publication
  • Source: Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS–71. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station. pp. 423-424

Abstract

In the Western Gulf Region of the United States, the traditional tool for planting loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) has been the dibble (planting bar). In the past decade an increasing number of acres have been planted with the hoedad. In areas where both tools were and are used, discussion about the superiority of one tool over the other for survival and subsequent growth have been on-going. This study was initiated to determine if the seedlings survived and grew better when planted with one tool or the other, when other planting variables were minimized. Survival, first- and second-year height, groundline diameter, first-year root weight, and first and second-year growth was found to be the same. There were no differences between the dibble and hoedad, and these were not different from the check, which was a planting hole made with a posthole digger. Planting failures using these tools can probably be traced to improper planting technique or improper handling of the seedlings prior to planting and not the tool in use.

  • Citation: Adams, John C.; Patterson, William B. 2004. Comparison of Planting Bar and Hoedad Planted Seedlings For Survival and Growth in a Controlled Environment. Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS–71. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station. pp. 423-424
  • Posted Date: April 1, 1980
  • Modified Date: August 22, 2006
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