Regional Summaries: Southwest Region

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  • Authors: Seybold, Steven J.; Graves, Andrew D.; Frankel, Susan J.; White, Allen; Sutherland, Carol A.; Munson, A. Steve.
  • Publication Year: 2021
  • Publication Series: Book Chapter
  • Source: In: Poland, Therese M.; Patel-Weynand, Toral; Finch, Deborah M.; Ford Miniat, Chelcy; Hayes, Deborah C.; Lopez, Vanessa M., eds. Invasive Species in Forests and Rangelands of the United States: A Comprehensive Science Synthesis for the United States Forest Sector. Heidelberg, Germany: Springer International Publishing: 377 - 401. Appendix.

Abstract

The Southwest region (Arizona, California, Colorado, Nevada, New Mexico, and Utah) (Figs. A4.1 and A4.2) is marked by Mediterranean, montane, and desert climates/ ecosystems that provide unique and amenable conditions and habitats for invading plants, pathogens, insects, and vertebrates. Aridity is perhaps the dominant climatic feature framing the forest ecosystems of the Southwest (Peterson 2012). Extreme elevational gradients and the intervening desert landscapes in this region (Fig. A4.2) create pronounced biogeographical boundaries and refugia for endemic species of plants and animals. The southern edge of this region has an extensive, but ecologically contiguous, border with Mexico that facilitates biological invasions. Future climate conditions projected for the southern portion of this region predict a trend of increasing temperature and decreasing precipitation (Cayan et al. 2010; Peterson 2012; Williams et al. 2010). Changing climate will likely place water stress on native trees and other plants, perhaps accelerating the establishment of invasive species (Peterson 2012) and amplifying outbreaks of native pest species (Breshears et al. 2005). These changes may also facilitate the spread of invasive species northward across this international border (e.g., Billings et al. 2014; Moser et al. 2005). The rate of spread of invasive species across this border may be increased by instances of unregulated movement of humans and cargo.

  • Citation: Seybold, Steven J.; Graves, Andrew D.; Frankel, Susan J.; White, Allen; Sutherland, Carol A.; Munson, A. Steve. 2021. Regional Summaries: Southwest Region. 2021. In: Poland, Therese M.; Patel-Weynand, Toral; Finch, Deborah M.; Ford Miniat, Chelcy; Hayes, Deborah C.; Lopez, Vanessa M., eds. Invasive Species in Forests and Rangelands of the United States: A Comprehensive Science Synthesis for the United States Forest Sector. Heidelberg, Germany: Springer International Publishing: 377 - 401. Appendix.
  • Posted Date: February 5, 2021
  • Modified Date: February 5, 2021
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