Elevated air temperature shifts the interactions between plants and endophytic fungal entomopathogens in an agroecosystem

  • Authors: Sui, Li; Zhu, Hui; Xu, Wenjing; Guo, Qinfeng; Wang, Ling; Zhang, Zhengkun; Li, Qiyun; Wang, Deli
  • Publication Year: 2020
  • Publication Series: Scientific Journal (JRNL)
  • Source: Fungal Ecology
  • DOI: 10.1016/j.funeco.2020.100940

Abstract

The possible effects of climate change on species interactions remain a very complex and challenging subject in community ecology. Here, we comparatively examine the interactions between maize (Zea mays) and an endophytic fungal entomopathogen (Beauveria bassiana) in a typical agroecosystem under both ambient and elevated air temperatures. We found that under ambient temperature certain key biological characteristics in maize (i.e., height, relative growth rate, biomass, and defense enzymes) and B. bassiana (i.e., conidia yield, germination rate of conidia, and virulence) were positively related to each other. Under elevated air temperature, however, we only detected positive effects of maize on B. bassiana (i.e., conidia yield, germination rate of conidia, and virulence), but little effect of B. bassiana on maize. These observations suggest that elevated air temperature could shift the interactions between plants and the endophytic fungal entomopathogens, possibly even from mutualism to commensalism. Both the nature and strength of species interactions are important for better understanding and predicting structure and stability of ecological communities in agroecosystems under climate change.

  • Citation: Sui, Li; Zhu, Hui; Xu, Wenjing; Guo, Qinfeng; Wang, Ling; Zhang, Zhengkun; Li, Qiyun; Wang, Deli. 2020. Elevated air temperature shifts the interactions between plants and endophytic fungal entomopathogens in an agroecosystem. Fungal Ecology. 47: 100940-. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.funeco.2020.100940.
  • Keywords: Agroecosystem, Beauveria bassiana, Climate warming, Endophytic. Insect pathogen fungi Maize, Species interactions
  • Posted Date: September 18, 2020
  • Modified Date: September 21, 2020
  • Print Publications Are No Longer Available

    In an ongoing effort to be fiscally responsible, the Southern Research Station (SRS) will no longer produce and distribute hard copies of our publications. Many SRS publications are available at cost via the Government Printing Office (GPO). Electronic versions of publications may be downloaded, printed, and distributed.

    Publication Notes

    • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.
    • Our online publications are scanned and captured using Adobe Acrobat. During the capture process some typographical errors may occur. Please contact the SRS webmaster if you notice any errors which make this publication unusable.
    • To view this article, download the latest version of Adobe Acrobat Reader.