Exotic invasive plants in southeastern forests

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  • Authors: Miller, James H.
  • Publication Year: 1998
  • Publication Series: Paper (invited, offered, keynote)
  • Source: In: Britton, Kerry O., ed. Exotic pests of eastern forests conference proceedings; 1997 April 8-10; Nashville, TN. U.S. Forest Service and Tennessee Exotic Pest Plant Council: 97-105.

Abstract

Invasive exotic plants usurp forest productivity, hinder forest-use activities, and limit diversity on millions of acres of forest land in the Southeast Infestations of these plants and their range are constantly expanding, This paper examines the various aspects of the problem. Outlined are the biology, origin, range, uses, and herbicide control for 14 of the most prevalent exotic trees, shrubs, vines, and grasses. Losses on forest lands will continue to increase until importation of new exotic species is controlled, Integrated Weed Management Programs are organized, and effective control procedures are implemented. Biological control technology using insect and pathogenic predators from the plant's home country offers the best long-term solution for subduing exotic invasive species.

  • Citation: Miller, James H. 1998. Exotic invasive plants in southeastern forests. In: Britton, Kerry O., ed. Exotic pests of eastern forests conference proceedings; 1997 April 8-10; Nashville, TN. U.S. Forest Service and Tennessee Exotic Pest Plant Council: 97-105.
  • Posted Date: April 1, 1980
  • Modified Date: April 3, 2013
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