Down woody material

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  • Authors: Woodall, Christopher W.
  • Publication Year: 2012
  • Publication Series: Book Chapter
  • Source: Bechtold, William A.; Bohne, Michael J.; Conkling, Barbara L.; Friedman, Dana L.; Tkacz, Borys M., eds. 2012. A synthesis of evaluation monitoring projects by the forest health monitoring program (1998–2007). Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS-159. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service, Southern Research Station. 140 p.

Abstract

The full range of possible down woody material ( DWM) research includes wildlife, nutrient cycling, fungi, fuels, carbon, biomass, water cycling/stream structures, and stand structural diversity. Of studies on DWM by the national Forest Health Monitoring (FHM) Program of the Forest Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture, 80 percent primarily focused on fire-related objectives. The only two remaining studies not focused on fire dealt with the mapping of snags and coarse woody debris, close to the topic of mapping DWM found in many fire studies. The explicit request for Evaluation Monitoring (EM) projects under the Fire EM umbrella has resulted in a dominance of fire-related studies to the exclusion of all other DWM topics. There have been no completed FHM studies explicitly and primarily focused on the DWM topics of wildlife, carbon, or structural diversity (for detailed description of dead wood ecology, please see Harmon and others 1986). 

  • Citation: Woodall, Christopher W. 2012. Down woody material. In: Bechtold, William A.; Bohne, Michael J.; Conkling, Barbara L. [and others], eds. A synthesis of evaluation monitoring projects by the forest health monitoring program (1998–2007). Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS-159. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service, Southern Research Station: 95–100.
  • Posted Date: February 25, 2019
  • Modified Date: March 26, 2019
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