West Coast forest diseases

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  • Authors: Filip, Gregory M.; Frankel, Susan J.; Goheen, Ellen M.; Moltzan, Bruce D.
  • Publication Year: 2012
  • Publication Series: Book Chapter
  • Source: Bechtold, William A.; Bohne, Michael J.; Conkling, Barbara L.; Friedman, Dana L.; Tkacz, Borys M., eds. 2012. A synthesis of evaluation monitoring projects by the forest health monitoring program (1998–2007). Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS-159. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service, Southern Research Station. 140 p.

Abstract

Forest diseases along the West Coast can be devastating, especially new introductions that are escalating with increased world trade of forest, ornamental, and agricultural products, as well as increased passenger travel and cargo shipments wrapped in wood-packing material. Recently introduced nonnative diseases such as sudden oak death have seriously affected the ornamental nursery industry in California, Oregon, and Washington as well as native coastal evergreen and redwood/tanoak (Sequoia sempervirens/Lithocarpus densiflorus) forests in California. Although relatively small in acreage because of early detection and mitigation, sudden oak death is also causing a deleterious impact to the tanoak ecosystems of southwest Oregon (total quarantine area in Curry County is 162 square miles (419.5 km2) as of the drafting of this chapter. 

  • Citation: Filip, Gregory M.; Frankel, Susan J.; Goheen, Ellen M.; Moltzan, Bruce D. 2012. West Coast forest diseases. In: Bechtold, William A.; Bohne, Michael J.; Conkling, Barbara L. [and others], eds. A synthesis of evaluation monitoring projects by the forest health monitoring program (1998–2007). Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS-159. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service, Southern Research Station: 63–72.
  • Posted Date: February 25, 2019
  • Modified Date: March 27, 2019
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