Crop tolerance of oak seedlings in herbaceous weed control applications using indaziflam

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  • Authors: Ezell, Andrew W.; Self, Andrew B.
  • Publication Year: 2018
  • Publication Series: Proceedings - Paper (PR-P)
  • Source: In Kirschman, Julia E., comp. 2018. Proceedings of the 19th biennial southern silvicultural research conference. e-General Technical Report SRS- 234. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service, Southern Research Station.

Abstract

Planting bareroot oak seedlings continues to account for substantial acreage across the South, especially on retired agricultural lands. It is now well established that good seedlings, good planting, and herbaceous weed control (HWC) are the trilogy of factors needed for consistently successful establishment. Survival exceeding 90 percent is now common when all three factors are satisfied. Even though research on HWC for oaks (Quercus spp.) began more than 25 years ago, the list of effective materials available for such use is still very short. Cost efficacy and crop tolerance remain the critical elements of evaluation for any new application. Indaziflam has shown promise for HWC applications in longleaf pine (Pinus palustris). In order to evaluate its use for oaks, six treatments were applied over the top of two species of recently planted oak seedlings at two planting sites in south Mississippi. All treatments were replicated three times at each site in these plantings of 1-0 bareroot seedlings. Plots were evaluated at 30, 60, 90, 120, and 150 days after treatment. Results indicate that indaziflam could be a useful alternative in oak plantings. The study provided a comparison of the indaziflam treatments to the current operational standard of post-plant sulfometuron methyl applications.

  • Citation:
    Ezell, Andrew W.; Self, Andrew B. 2018. Crop tolerance of oak seedlings in herbaceous weed control applications using indaziflam. In Kirschman, Julia E., comp. 2018. Proceedings of the 19th biennial southern silvicultural research conference. e-General Technical Report SRS- 234. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service, Southern Research Station. 444 p. (pages 9-13)
  • Posted Date: October 23, 2018
  • Modified Date: October 23, 2018
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