Residual effects of mechanical site preparation on soil compaction in oak (Quercus spp.) plantings

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  • Authors: Self, Andrew B.; Ezell, Andrew W.; Schultz, Emily B.
  • Publication Year: 2018
  • Publication Series: Proceedings - Paper (PR-P)
  • Source: In: Kirschman, Julia E., comp. 2018. Proceedings of the 19th biennial southern silvicultural research conference. e-General Technical Report SRS- 234. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service, Southern Research Station.

Abstract

Mechanical site preparation is often used to aid with amelioration of compacted soil conditions typically found on former agricultural areas. While immediate reduction in soil compaction through use of cultural treatments is well studied, less research is available regarding longer term mechanical treatment residual effects. Four mechanical site preparation treatments were employed across three Mississippi sites during the winter of 2007. Treatments were installed using 10-foot centers as follows: control, subsoiling, bedding, and combination plowing. Two years post-treatment, 216 paired reading locations were randomly selected within each mechanical treatment area to sample soil resistance difference between treatment and non-treatment areas. Mechanical soil resistance was measured to a depth of 18 inches with readings taken at 3-inch depth intervals. Analysis determined significant site interactions. Consequently, sites were analyzed independently for main effects and interactions. Soil resistance differences varied by treatment with more intensive treatments exhibiting greater residual differences compared to those observed in less intensive treatment areas.

  • Citation: Self, Andrew B.; Ezell, Andrew W.; Schultz, Emily B. 2018. Residual effects of mechanical site preparation on soil compaction in oak (Quercus spp.) plantings. In Kirschman, Julia E., comp. 2018. Proceedings of the 19th biennial southern silvicultural research conference. e-General Technical  Report SRS- 234. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service, Southern Research Station. 444 p. pages 1-3.
     
  • Posted Date: October 23, 2018
  • Modified Date: October 23, 2018
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