Evaluation of a conventional harvesting system for a hardwood restoration project on the George Washington and Jefferson National Forests

  • Authors: Klepac, John; Mitchell, Dana
  • Publication Year: 2018
  • Publication Series: Paper (invited, offered, keynote)
  • Source: In: Proceedings of the 41st Annual Meeting of the Council on Forest Engineering: Revolutionary Traditions, Innovative Industries; July 15-18, 2018. Williamsburg, VA

Abstract

A conventional ground-based harvesting system was evaluated while implementing a shelterwood with reserves silvicultural prescription in a hardwood stand on the George Washington and Jefferson National Forests. The 16.3 acre study unit consisted predominately of chestnut oak (Quercus montana), scarlet oak (Quercus coccinea), and white oak (Quercus alba). Trees 6 inches Diameter at breast height (Dbh) and larger were measured in two felling plots. The mean Dbh was 11.8 inches with an average of 154 trees per acre (TPA). Machines evaluated included a drive-to-tree feller-buncher equipped with a saw head and a grapple skidder. Preliminary analyses revealed the feller-buncher averaged 52.8 green tons/Productive Machine Hour (gt/PMH), while the skidder averaged of 37.6 gt/PMH. Machine rate analyses resulted in an hourly cost of $150.44/PMH for the feller-buncher and $158.63/PMH for the skidder. Unit costs for the feller-buncher ranged from $2.50/gt to $3.44/gt and $4.22/gt for the skidder.

  • Citation: Klepac, John; Mitchell, Dana. 2018. Evaluation of a conventional harvesting system for a hardwood restoration project on the George Washington and Jefferson National Forests. In:  Proceedings of the 41st Annual Meeting of the Council on Forest Engineering: Revolutionary Traditions, Innovative Industries; July 15-18, 2018. Williamsburg, VA. 9 p.
  • Keywords: harvesting, hardwood harvesting, ground-based system, feller-buncher, skidder
  • Posted Date: September 20, 2018
  • Modified Date: October 23, 2018
  • Print Publications Are No Longer Available

    In an ongoing effort to be fiscally responsible, the Southern Research Station (SRS) will no longer produce and distribute hard copies of our publications. Many SRS publications are available at cost via the Government Printing Office (GPO). Electronic versions of publications may be downloaded, printed, and distributed.

    Publication Notes

    • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.
    • Our online publications are scanned and captured using Adobe Acrobat. During the capture process some typographical errors may occur. Please contact the SRS webmaster if you notice any errors which make this publication unusable.
    • To view this article, download the latest version of Adobe Acrobat Reader.