Soil carbon

This article is part of a larger document. View the larger document here.

  • Authors: Perry, Charles H.; Amacher, Michael C.
  • Publication Year: 2007
  • Publication Series: Book Chapter
  • Source: In: Forest health monitoring: 2005 national technical report. General Technical Report SRS-104. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station.

Abstract

Why Is Soil Carbon Important? The sequestration of carbon by forest and agricultural soils has the potential to significantly reduce greenhouse gas concentrations (Pacala and Socolow 2004). Many countries are implementing field inventories of soil carbon, often combined with data from other sources, to estimate soil carbon sequestration rates and amounts (Kurz and Apps 2003; McKenzie and others 2000; Scott and others 2002). Models are currently used to predict the contribution of soil carbon to the total forest carbon sequestration in the United States (Heath and others 2002, Smith and Heath 2002). Current estimates suggest that > 50 percent of the total stored forest carbon is held in the soil with an additional fraction in the forest floor (Birdsey and Heath 1997, Heath and Birdsey 1997, Smith and others 2004). Our relatively new effort to inventory soil carbon should enrich these efforts to model soil carbon and document forest sequestration of atmospheric carbon dioxide.

  • Citation: Perry, Charles H.; Amacher, Michael C. 2007. Soil carbon. In: Forest health monitoring: 2005 national technical report. General Technical Report SRS-104. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station. (pages 67-72)
  • Posted Date: March 27, 2018
  • Modified Date: March 27, 2018
  • Print Publications Are No Longer Available

    In an ongoing effort to be fiscally responsible, the Southern Research Station (SRS) will no longer produce and distribute hard copies of our publications. Many SRS publications are available at cost via the Government Printing Office (GPO). Electronic versions of publications may be downloaded, printed, and distributed.

    Publication Notes

    • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.
    • Our online publications are scanned and captured using Adobe Acrobat. During the capture process some typographical errors may occur. Please contact the SRS webmaster if you notice any errors which make this publication unusable.
    • To view this article, download the latest version of Adobe Acrobat Reader.