Genetic diversity and differentiation of yellowwood [Cladrastis kentukea (Dum.Cours.) Rudd] growing in the wild and in planted populations outside the natural range

  • Authors: LaBonte, Nicholas; Tonos, Jadelys; Hartel, Colleen; Woeste, Keith E.
  • Publication Year: 2017
  • Publication Series: Scientific Journal (JRNL)
  • Source: New Forests
  • DOI: 10.1007/s11056-017-9566-8

Abstract

Yellowwood (Cladrastis kentukea) grows in small, widely scattered populations in the wild, but is also a popular ornamental tree that thrives when planted in urban areas outside its natural range. Since the small native populations of yellowwood in several states are considered at risk of extirpation, the cultivated population could serve as an ex situ repository of yellowwood genetic diversity that could be used to restore lost local populations of the species. The potential value of cultivated yellowwood for conservation depends on the genetic diversity among cultivated trees compared to natural populations. Using nuclear microsatellite markers, we genotyped 180 yellowwoods from natural populations in Indiana, Missouri, Arkansas, and Kentucky, along with 61 trees from urban parks and landscapes in Indiana, Ohio, and Missouri. We found that, even when statistics were adjusted based on population size, the urban "population" had higher genetic diversity than any of the wild populations sampled, indicating that commercially-grown yellowwood is most likely a mixture of genotypes from isolated wild populations. We observed strong genetic differentiation among wild populations, and evidence for inbreeding in at least one of the wild populations.

  • Citation: LaBonte, Nicholas; Tonos, Jadelys; Hartel, Colleen; Woeste, Keith E. 2017.Genetic diversity and differentiation of yellowwood [Cladrastis kentukea (Dum.Cours.) Rudd] growing in the wild and in planted populations outside the natural range. New Forests. 48(2): 263-274. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11056-017-9566-8.
  • Keywords: Ex situ conservation, Urban forest, Landscape genetics, Fabaceae
  • Posted Date: August 23, 2017
  • Modified Date: August 23, 2017
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    • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.
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