Effects of Forest Management Practices on Terrestrial Coleopteran Assemblages in Sand Pine Scrub

  • Authors: Greenberg, Cathryn H.; Thomas, Michael C.
  • Publication Year: 1995
  • Publication Series: Miscellaneous Publication
  • Source: Florida Entomologist, Volume 78. Number 2, June 1995

Abstract

Coleopteran assemblages were sampled monthly for one year using pitfall traps in replicated sites of three 5- to 7-year-old disturbance treatments and mature forested sand pine scrub in the Ocala National Forest, Marion County, Florida. Disturbance treatments were (1) burning at high-intensity and salvage-logging; (2) clearcutting, roller-chopping and broadcast seeding, and; (3) clearcutting and bracke-seeding. Community similarity of coleopterans was high. No differences in species richness, diversity, density, or evenness were detected. Of 40 species captured, only seven were common (n > 50). Predaceous beetles were numerically dominant followed by scavengers. Few xylophagous or herbivorous coleopterans were captured, probably due to trap bias. Peaks of annual above-ground terrestrial activity varied among species. An absence of differences among treatments may reflect similar plant communities or structural habitat features. Additionally, a dearth of mature forest specialists might be predicted in systems where mature forest was historically rare due to large-scale, high-intensity, and low-frequency wildfire.

  • Citation: Greenberg, Cathryn H.; Thomas, Michael C. 1995. Effects of Forest Management Practices on Terrestrial Coleopteran Assemblages in Sand Pine Scrub. Florida Entomologist, Volume 78. Number 2, June 1995
  • Keywords: Beetle assemblage, clearcutting, wildfire
  • Posted Date: April 1, 1980
  • Modified Date: August 22, 2006
  • Print Publications Are No Longer Available

    In an ongoing effort to be fiscally responsible, the Southern Research Station (SRS) will no longer produce and distribute hard copies of our publications. Many SRS publications are available at cost via the Government Printing Office (GPO). Electronic versions of publications may be downloaded, printed, and distributed.

    Publication Notes

    • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.
    • Our online publications are scanned and captured using Adobe Acrobat. During the capture process some typographical errors may occur. Please contact the SRS webmaster if you notice any errors which make this publication unusable.
    • To view this article, download the latest version of Adobe Acrobat Reader.