Effect of Herbicides on Soil Productivity and Water Quality

  • Authors: Neary, Daniel G.; Michael, Jerry L.
  • Publication Year: 1989
  • Publication Series: Miscellaneous Publication
  • Source: In: Final Environmental Impact Statement; Vegetation Mangement in the Coastal Plain/Piedmont, Appendices, Volume II. Management Bulletin R8-MB 23; U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, SOuthern Region. January 1989

Abstract

The southern yellow pine and hardwood forests of the South constitute some of the most intensively managed forest ecosystems in the world (Stone 1983; Kellison and Gingrich 1982). These forests also occur in a region with one of the fastest growing human populations in the United States. Furthermore, future resource demands in the South will certainly intensify as the population expands and the forest land base shrinks. The whole mix of public and private forest resources including wood, wildlife, recreation, range, and water will need intensive management to meet increased demands. One crucial concern resulting from this intensification of forest management is the potential effect of silvicultural practices on water and soil resources.

  • Citation: Neary, Daniel G.; Michael, Jerry L. 1989. Effect of Herbicides on Soil Productivity and Water Quality. In: Final Environmental Impact Statement; Vegetation Mangement in the Coastal Plain/Piedmont, Appendices, Volume II. Management Bulletin R8-MB 23; U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, SOuthern Region. January 1989
  • Posted Date: January 1, 2000
  • Modified Date: August 22, 2006
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