Fate of Hexazinone and Picloram in Southern United States Forest Watersheds

  • Authors: Neary, D.G.; Bush, P.B.; Michael, J.L.
  • Publication Year: 1986
  • Publication Series: Miscellaneous Publication
  • Source: The Sixth International Congress of Pesticide Chemistry IUPAC 1986 August 10-15; Ottawa, Canada 6B-15. Abstract.

Abstract

Herbicides are being used more frequently in the intensively managed forest ecosystems of the southeastern United States. Host of this increased use occurs during site preparation prior to replanting cutover or converted stands. Herbicides provide a cost effective tool for controlling herbaceous and woody weed competition which adversely affects pine establishment and early growth. Herbicides are also useful in minimizing erosion which can affect site productivity and water quality. Since forested watersheds throughout the South are sources for high quality municipal and domestic drinking water. there has been considerable concern over the potential for water contamination with herbicide residues. This paper highlights the results from several ecosystem fate studies which have evaluated the environmental fate of two commonly used forestry herbicides, hexazinone and picloram.

  • Citation: Neary, D.G.; Bush, P.B.; Michael, J.L. 1986. Fate of Hexazinone and Picloram in Southern United States Forest Watersheds. The Sixth International Congress of Pesticide Chemistry IUPAC 1986 August 10-15; Ottawa, Canada 6B-15. Abstract.
  • Posted Date: April 1, 1980
  • Modified Date: August 22, 2006
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