Forest biogeochemistry in response to drought

  • Authors: Schlesinger, William H.; Dietze, Michael C.; Jackson, Robert B.; Phillips, Richard P.; Rhoades, Charles C.; Rustad, Lindsey E.; Vose, James M.
  • Publication Year: 2015
  • Publication Series: Scientific Journal (JRNL)
  • Source: Global Change Biology. doi: 10.1111/gcb.13105.
  • DOI: 10.1111/gcb.13105

Abstract

Trees alter their use and allocation of nutrients in response to drought, and changes in soil nutrient cycling and trace gas flux (N2O and CH4) are observed when experimental drought is imposed on forests. In extreme droughts, trees are increasingly susceptible to attack by pests and pathogens, which can lead to major changes in nutrient flux to the soil. Extreme droughts often lead to more common and more intense forest fires, causing dramatic changes in the nutrient storage and loss from forest ecosystems. Changes in the future manifestation of drought will affect carbon uptake and storage in forests, leading to feedbacks to the Earth's climate system. We must improve the recognition of drought in nature, our ability to manage our forests in the face of drought, and the parameterization of drought in earth system models for improved predictions of carbon uptake and storage in the world's forests.

  • Citation: Schlesinger, William H.; Dietze, Michael C.; Jackson, Robert B.; Phillips, Richard P.; Rhoades, Charles C.; Rustad, Lindsey E.; Vose, James M. 2015. Forest biogeochemistry in response to drought. Global Change Biology. doi: 10.1111/gcb.13105.

  • Keywords: biogeochemistry, carbon cycle, fire, forest management, insect attack, soil biogeochemistry, mountain pine beetle
  • Posted Date: April 23, 2016
  • Modified Date: January 26, 2017
  • Print Publications Are No Longer Available

    In an ongoing effort to be fiscally responsible, the Southern Research Station (SRS) will no longer produce and distribute hard copies of our publications. Many SRS publications are available at cost via the Government Printing Office (GPO). Electronic versions of publications may be downloaded, printed, and distributed.

    Publication Notes

    • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.
    • To view this article, download the latest version of Adobe Acrobat Reader.