Using GLEAMS to Select Environmental Windows for Herbicide Application in Forests

  • Authors: Smith, M.C.; Michael, J.L.; Koisel, W.G.; Nealy, D.G.
  • Publication Year: 1994
  • Publication Series: Miscellaneous Publication
  • Source: In: Campbell, K.L.; Graham, W.D.; Bottcher, A.B., eds. Proceedings of the environmental sound agriculture conference; 1994 April 20-22; Orlando, FL. St.Joseph, MI: American Society of Agricultural Engineers: 506-512

Abstract

Observed herbicide runoff and groundwater data from a pine-release herbicide application study near Gainesville, Florida were used to validate the GLEAMS model hydrology and pesticide component for forest application. The study revealed that model simulations agreed relatively well with the field data for the one-year study. Following validation, a modified version of GLEAMS was applied using a 50 year climatic record to determine the periods (windows) for least water quality degradation within the Forest Service's recommended application window for best vegetation control. The pesticide component of GLEAMS was modified to simulate up to 245 pesticides simultaneously. Four herbicides commonly used in the region to control competing vegetation were represented in the model study. Within the application windows for each herbicide, the best application dates, or "environmental" windows were determined to minimize environmental effecfects for each location. Results of the simulation study are tabulated in the paper for use in the forest industry.

  • Citation: Smith, M.C.; Michael, J.L.; Koisel, W.G.; Nealy, D.G. 1994. Using GLEAMS to Select Environmental Windows for Herbicide Application in Forests. In: Campbell, K.L.; Graham, W.D.; Bottcher, A.B., eds. Proceedings of the environmental sound agriculture conference; 1994 April 20-22; Orlando, FL. St.Joseph, MI: American Society of Agricultural Engineers: 506-512
  • Posted Date: April 1, 1980
  • Modified Date: August 22, 2006
  • Print Publications Are No Longer Available

    In an ongoing effort to be fiscally responsible, the Southern Research Station (SRS) will no longer produce and distribute hard copies of our publications. Many SRS publications are available at cost via the Government Printing Office (GPO). Electronic versions of publications may be downloaded, printed, and distributed.

    Publication Notes

    • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.
    • Our online publications are scanned and captured using Adobe Acrobat. During the capture process some typographical errors may occur. Please contact the SRS webmaster if you notice any errors which make this publication unusable.
    • To view this article, download the latest version of Adobe Acrobat Reader.