Thirteen Year Loblolly Pine Growth Following Machine Application of Cut-Stump Treament Herbicides For Hardwood Stump-Sprout Control

  • Authors: Vidrine, Clyde G.; Adams, John C.
  • Publication Year: 2002
  • Publication Series: Miscellaneous Publication
  • Source: In: Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS-48. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station. pg. 257-259

Abstract

Thirteen year growth results of 1-0 out-planted loblolly pine seedlings on nonintensively prepared up-land mixed pine-hardwood sites receiving machine applied cut-stump treatment (CST) herbicides onto hardwood stumps at the time of harvesting is presented. Plantation pine growth shows significantly higher growth for pine in the CST treated plots compared to non-CST plots. Planted pine survival, diameter, height, stem-volume, and total volume per plot was higher in CST treated plots when compared to non-treated plots. Total pine volume in CST treated plots is as high as 125 percent higher than in non-treated plots. Pine growth advantage in CST treated plots has existed since time of planting. CST herbicides were selectively applied to the cut surface of hardwood stumps for stump-sprout control. The selective application of CST herbicides was combined with operation of a drive-to-tree type feller-buncher tree-harvester.

  • Citation: Vidrine, Clyde G.; Adams, John C. 2002. Thirteen Year Loblolly Pine Growth Following Machine Application of Cut-Stump Treament Herbicides For Hardwood Stump-Sprout Control. In: Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS-48. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station. pg. 257-259
  • Posted Date: April 1, 1980
  • Modified Date: August 22, 2006
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