Eastern cottonwood and black willow biomass crop production in the Lower Mississippi Alluvial Valley under four planting densities

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  • Authors: Souter, Ray A.; Gardiner, Emile S; Leininger, Theodor D.; Mitchell, Dana; Rummer, Robert B.
  • Publication Year: 2015
  • Publication Series: Proceedings - Paper (PR-P)
  • Source: In Proceedings of the 17th biennial southern silvicultural research conference. e–Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS–203. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station. 3 p.

Abstract

"Wood is an obvious alternative energy source": Johnson and others (2007) declare the potential of short-rotation intensively-managed woody crop systems to produce biomass for energy. While obvious as an energy source, costs of production need to be measured to assess the economic viability of selected tree species as woody perennial energy crops

  • Citation: Souter, Ray A.; Gardiner, Emile S; Leininger, Theodor D.; Mitchell, Dana; Rummer, Robert B. 2015. Eastern cottonwood and black willow biomass crop production in the Lower Mississippi Alluvial Valley under four planting densities. In Proceedings of the 17th biennial southern silvicultural research conference. e–Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS–203. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station. 3 p.
  • Posted Date: February 10, 2015
  • Modified Date: February 12, 2015
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