Assessing potential genetic gains from varietal planting stock in loblolly pine plantations

This article is part of a larger document. View the larger document here.

  • Authors: Roberts, Scott D.; Rousseau, Randall J.; Herrin, B. Landis
  • Publication Year: 2013
  • Publication Series: Paper (invited, offered, keynote)
  • Source: In: Guldin, James M., ed. 2013. Proceedings of the 15th biennial southern silvicultural research conference. e-Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS-GTR-175. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station. 241-245.

Abstract

Forest landowners have increasingly more options when it comes to loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) planting stock. The majority of plantations in recent decades have been established with seedlings produced from second-generation open-pollinated (second-Gen OP) seed. However, foresters have begun recognizing the increased gains obtainable from full-sib families produced using mass-controlled pollination (MCP) techniques. The next step in genetic improvement is varietal forestry. Forest biotechnology firms are producing loblolly pine varietal planting stock for deployment in the Southeastern United States. Continued testing of this material will determine individual genotypes best suited for specific sites or desired products. In 2007, a Loblolly Pine Genetic Level Study was installed in northern Mississippi to examine differences in growth among second-Gen OP seedlings, MCP seedlings, and loblolly pine varieties derived from somatic embryogenesis. Following two growing seasons, the average height of the MCP material was slightly but significantly taller than that of the varietal planting stock. The average height of the top five performing varieties was 18 percent taller than the varietal average, 14 percent taller than the average height of the second-Gen OP, and 6 percent taller than the MCP material.

  • Citation: Roberts, Scott D.; Rousseau, Randall J.; Herrin, B. Landis 2013. Assessing potential genetic gains from varietal planting stock in loblolly pine plantations. In: Guldin, James M., ed. 2013. Proceedings of the 15th biennial southern silvicultural research conference. e-Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS-GTR-175. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station. 241-245.
  • Posted Date: August 2, 2013
  • Modified Date: August 2, 2013
  • Print Publications Are No Longer Available

    In an ongoing effort to be fiscally responsible, the Southern Research Station (SRS) will no longer produce and distribute hard copies of our publications. Many SRS publications are available at cost via the Government Printing Office (GPO). Electronic versions of publications may be downloaded, printed, and distributed.

    Publication Notes

    • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.
    • Our online publications are scanned and captured using Adobe Acrobat. During the capture process some typographical errors may occur. Please contact the SRS webmaster if you notice any errors which make this publication unusable.
    • To view this article, download the latest version of Adobe Acrobat Reader.