Land classification of the standing stone state forest and state park on the eastern highland rim in Tennessee: the interaction of geology, topography, and soils

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  • Authors: Smalley, Glendon W.; McCowan, Carlie; Todd, S. David; Morrissey, Phillip M.; McBride, J. Andrew
  • Publication Year: 2013
  • Publication Series: Paper (invited, offered, keynote)
  • Source: In: Guldin, James M., ed. 2013. Proceedings of the 15th biennial southern silvicultural research conference. e-Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS-GTR-175. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station. 561-573.

Abstract

This paper summarizes the application of a land classification system developed by the senior author to the Standing Stone State Forest and State Park (SSSF&SP) on the Eastern Highland Rim. Landtypes are the most detailed level in the hierarchical system and represent distinct units of the landscape (mapped at a scale of 1:24,000) as defined by climate, geology, soils, topography, and vegetation. The area is highly dissected with local relief of about 1,000 feet. Mississippian and Ordovician strata are essentially level bedded; defining elevations were assigned. Suites of soils are common to the nine strata, and a group of landtypes was defined for each geologic strata/soils combination. Each of the 19 landtypes is described in terms of 9 elements. Additional information includes species suitability, site productivity, and operability for management activities. The maps aid the delineation of stands, streamside management zones, and “conservation” and other special use areas; the location of rare, threatened and endangered (RT&E) species; the design of harvests; and the modeling of future forest conditions. The landtypes are an integral element in modeling wildlife habitat, in siting game food plots, and planning other wildlife management activities. The maps are excellent training devices and extremely useful in explaining management plans to legislators and the public.

  • Citation: Smalley, Glendon W.; McCowan, Carlie; Todd, S. David; Morrissey, Phillip M.; McBride, J. Andrew 2013. Land classification of the standing stone state forest and state park on the eastern highland rim in Tennessee: the interaction of geology, topography, and soils. In: Guldin, James M., ed. 2013. Proceedings of the 15th biennial southern silvicultural research conference. e-Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS-GTR-175. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station. 561-573.
  • Posted Date: June 19, 2013
  • Modified Date: August 2, 2013
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