A comparison of canopy structure measures for predicting height growth of underplanted seedlings

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  • Authors: Lhotka, John M.; Loewenstein, Edward F.
  • Publication Year: 2013
  • Publication Series: Paper (invited, offered, keynote)
  • Source: In: Guldin, James M., ed. 2013. Proceedings of the 15th biennial southern silvicultural research conference. e-Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS-GTR-175. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station. 289-293.

Abstract

The study compares the relationship between 15 measures of canopy structure and height growth of underplanted yellow-poplar (Liriodendron tulipifera L.) seedlings. Investigators used 4 midstory removal intensities to create a structural gradient across fifty 0.05-ha experimental plots; removals resulted in a range of canopy cover between 51 to 96 percent. Twelve 1-year-old containerized yellow-poplar seedlings were planted within each plot. Height growth was monitored through two growing seasons (2004 to 2005). Investigators used regression analysis (n = 50) to predict 2-year height growth using measures of tree size and density, canopy openness, and vertical structure. Model of best-fit included height to the forest canopy and canopy cover estimated using crown width models (R² = 0.78). Results emphasize the potential importance of quantifying horizontal and vertical canopy characteristics when evaluating the relationship between forest structure and growth of underplanted seedlings.

  • Citation: Lhotka, John M.; Loewenstein, Edward F. 2013. A comparison of canopy structure measures for predicting height growth of underplanted seedlings. In: Guldin, James M., ed. 2013. Proceedings of the 15th biennial southern silvicultural research conference. e-Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS-GTR-175. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station. 289-293.
  • Posted Date: June 5, 2013
  • Modified Date: August 2, 2013
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