Predicting diameter at breast height from total height and crown length

This article is part of a larger document. View the larger document here.

  • Authors: Cao, Quang V.; Dean, Thomas J.
  • Publication Year: 2013
  • Publication Series: Paper (invited, offered, keynote)
  • Source: In: Guldin, James M., ed. 2013. Proceedings of the 15th biennial southern silvicultural research conference. e-Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS-GTR-175. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station. 201-205.

Abstract

Tree diameter at breast height (d.b.h.) is often predicted from total height (model 1a) or both total height and number of trees per acre (model 1b). These approaches are useful when Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data are available. LiDAR height data can be employed to predict tree d.b.h., and consequently individual tree volumes and volume/ ha can be obtained for the tract. In this paper, we will examine alternative methods of predicting d.b.h. from total height and crown length (model 2a), or from total height, crown length, and number of trees per acre (model 2b), based on the uniform stress theory. The uniform stress theory hypothesizes that stems behave like tapered cantilever beams to equalize bending stress across their length. The four models were evaluated based on the mean difference between observed and predicted diameters, mean absolute difference, and fit index. Results revealed that the two models based on the uniform stress theory (models 2a and 2b) were more appropriate for predicting d.b.h., which is needed to compute tract volume using LiDAR data.

  • Citation: Cao, Quang V.; Dean, Thomas J. 2013. Predicting diameter at breast height from total height and crown length. In: Guldin, James M., ed. 2013. Proceedings of the 15th biennial southern silvicultural research conference. e-Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS-GTR-175. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station. 201-205.
  • Posted Date: June 4, 2013
  • Modified Date: June 4, 2013
  • Print Publications Are No Longer Available

    In an ongoing effort to be fiscally responsible, the Southern Research Station (SRS) will no longer produce and distribute hard copies of our publications. Many SRS publications are available at cost via the Government Printing Office (GPO). Electronic versions of publications may be downloaded, printed, and distributed.

    Publication Notes

    • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.
    • Our online publications are scanned and captured using Adobe Acrobat. During the capture process some typographical errors may occur. Please contact the SRS webmaster if you notice any errors which make this publication unusable.
    • To view this article, download the latest version of Adobe Acrobat Reader.