Financial performance of loblolly and longleaf pine plantations

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  • Authors: Mills, Steven D.; Stiff, Charles T.
  • Publication Year: 2013
  • Publication Series: Paper (invited, offered, keynote)
  • Source: In: Guldin, James M., ed. 2013. Proceedings of the 15th biennial southern silvicultural research conference. e-Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS-GTR-175. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station. 183-191.

Abstract

The financial performance of selected management regimes for loblolly (Pinus taeda L.) and longleaf pine (P. palustris Mill.) plantations were compared for four cases, each with low- and high-site productivity levels and each evaluated using 5 and 7 percent real discount rates. In all cases, longleaf pine was considered both with and without pine straw harvesting. The analysis also examined the financial impacts of various sawtimber proportions valued as poles. With the addition of pine straw revenues, longleaf management can yield returns that are comparable to typical loblolly pine regimes (–16 to +3 percent, depending on site quality and discount rate). With as little as 25 percent of sawtimber considered poles, longleaf pine financially outperformed loblolly at all site and discount rate combinations. Results indicate that longleaf pine may be an attractive alternative for some landowners, due to both lower establishment costs and the favorable land expectation value comparisons.

  • Citation: Mills, Steven D.; Stiff, Charles T. 2013. Financial performance of loblolly and longleaf pine plantations. In: Guldin, James M., ed. 2013. Proceedings of the 15th biennial southern silvicultural research conference. e-Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS-GTR-175. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station. 183-191.
  • Posted Date: June 4, 2013
  • Modified Date: June 4, 2013
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