A decision tree approach using silvics to guide planning for forest restoration

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  • Authors: Hermann, Sharon M.; Kush, John S.; Gilbert, John C.
  • Publication Year: 2013
  • Publication Series: Paper (invited, offered, keynote)
  • Source: In: Guldin, James M., ed. 2013. Proceedings of the 15th biennial southern silvicultural research conference. e-Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS-GTR-175. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station. 115-122.

Abstract

We created a decision tree based on silvics of longleaf pine (Pinus palustris) and historical descriptions to develop approaches for restoration management at Horseshoe Bend National Military Park located in central Alabama. A National Park Service goal is to promote structure and composition of a forest that likely surrounded the 1814 battlefield. We considered options for (1) stands currently supporting second-growth montane longleaf, (2) isolated trees, and (3) areas beyond dispersal range of longleaf seed. We estimate >50 percent of the property is appropriate for longleaf but <20 percent is within dispersal range of existing seed trees. There are three major areas with current densities sufficient to be classified as longleaf stands—in these high-priority stands, fuel reduction burns are being applied to maintain adult trees and create appropriate seedbeds. Criteria applied to isolated trees categorize them as medium priority. Areas beyond seed dispersal range of longleaf are low priority and require planting.

  • Citation: Hermann, Sharon M.; Kush, John S.; Gilbert, John C. 2013. A decision tree approach using silvics to guide planning for forest restoration. In: Guldin, James M., ed. 2013. Proceedings of the 15th biennial southern silvicultural research conference. e-Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS-GTR-175. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station. 115-122.
  • Posted Date: May 20, 2013
  • Modified Date: August 14, 2013
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