Improving restoration to control plant invasions under climate change

  • Authors: Guo, Qinfeng; Norman, Steve
  • Publication Year: 2012
  • Publication Series: Book Chapter
  • Source: In: Jose, S.; Singh, H.; Batish, D.; Kohli, R., eds. Invasive Plant Ecology. CRC Press, Boca Raton. 201-214.

Abstract

Native forests and grasslands worldwide have been converted to developed lands or invaded by exotic species due to human activities. These pressures are predicted to increase with population growth and climatic stress in coming decades, escalating concerns for the viability of native species and communities that are affected. Ecological restoration is frequently offered as a partial solution to these changes because less stressed ecosystems may be more tolerant of novel changes in the environment (Temperton et al. 2004, Clewell and Aronson 2008). In this sense, restoration could provide a strategy for enhancing ecological resilience, given escalating problems associated with invasives and a changing climate (see Hobbs and Norton 1996).

  • Citation: Guo, Qinfeng; Norman, Steve 2012. Improving restoration to control plant invasions under climate change. In: Jose, S.; Singh, H.; Batish, D.; Kohli, R., eds. Invasive Plant Ecology. CRC Press, Boca Raton. 201-214.
  • Posted Date: March 6, 2013
  • Modified Date: October 28, 2013
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