Regeneration after Clearcutting in the Southern Appalachians

  • Authors: McGee, Charles E.; Hooper, Ralph M.
  • Publication Year: 1970
  • Publication Series: Research Paper (RP)
  • Source: Research Paper SE-RP-070. Asheville, NC: USDA-Forest Service, Southeastern Forest Experiment Station. 14p.

Abstract

Even-aged silviculture with its associated heavy harvest cutting has tremendous potential for regenerating upland hardwoods. However, evenaged silviculture must involve much more than a heavy harvest cut, for a heavy cut alone does not necessarily solve all of the problems of upland hardwood regeneration. In this paper a careful look is taken at a 46-acre tract of timberland 5 years after a complete clearcut. Although some questions as to the future of the area are unanswered, the tremendous growth rate and rapid stand development allow a preview of things to come.

  • Citation: McGee, Charles E.; Hooper, Ralph M. 1970. Regeneration after Clearcutting in the Southern Appalachians. Research Paper SE-RP-070. Asheville, NC: USDA-Forest Service, Southeastern Forest Experiment Station. 14p.
  • Posted Date: December 14, 2012
  • Modified Date: December 14, 2012
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