Impregnation of bio-oil from small diameter pine into wood for moisture resistance

  • Authors: Robinson, Thomas J.; Via, Brian K.; Fasina, Oladiran; Adhikari, Sushil; Carter, Emily
  • Publication Year: 2011
  • Publication Series: Scientific Journal (JRNL)
  • Source: BioResources 6(4):4747-4761

Abstract

Wood pyrolysis oil consists of hundreds of complex compounds, many of which are phenolic-based and exhibit hydrophobic properties. Southern yellow pine was impregnated with a pyrolysis oil-based penetrant using both a high pressure and vacuum impregnation systems, with no significant differences in retention levels. Penetrant concentrations ranging from 5-50% pyrolysis oil/methanol on a volume basis were used to determine the threshold concentration for significant physical property improvement. Wood impregnated with penetrant concentration of at least 10% exhibited significant reduction in both moisture sorption and tangential swelling when exposed to a 90% relative humidity and 21°C environment. When exposed to liquid water in a 24-hour soak test, analysis revealed a negative sorption and tangential swell. However, during the course of the 24-hour soak test, a significant linear relationship between penetrant concentration and leachate was determined.

  • Citation: Robinson, Thomas J.; Via, Brian K.; Fasina, Oladiran; Adhikari, Sushil; Carter, Emily 2011. Impregnation of bio-oil from small diameter pine into wood for moisture resistance. BioResources 6(4):4747-4761.
  • Keywords: bio-oil, pyrolysis oil, pressure treatment, moisture resistance, Southern yellow pine
  • Posted Date: August 22, 2012
  • Modified Date: October 1, 2012
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