Extending the capabilities of an individual tree growth simulator to model non-traditional loblolly pine plantation systems for multiple products

This article is part of a larger document. View the larger document here.

  • Authors: Amateis, Ralph L.; Burkhart, Harold E.
  • Publication Year: 2012
  • Publication Series: Paper (invited, offered, keynote)
  • Source: In: Butnor, John R., ed. 2012. Proceedings of the 16th biennial southern silvicultural research conference. e-Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS-156. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service, Southern Research Station. 7-9.

Abstract

Demand for traditional wood products from southern forests continues to increase even as demand for woody biomass for uses such as biofuels is on the rise. How to manage the plantation resource to meet demand for multiple products from a shrinking land base is of critical importance. Nontraditional plantation systems comprised of two populations planted on the same site and managed tor multiple products may be an economical and environmentally attractive alternative. In order to examine the feasibility and profitability of these systems, growth and yield models flexible enough for such regimes will be needed. In this paper we describe how an individual tree growth and yield simulator for loblolly pine (PTAEDA) can be altered to accommodate two populations of loblolly pine trees planted at different densities and spacings on the same site and managed for alternative product objectives. Investigations underway suggest that the individual tree growth model architecture may be a suitable platform for modeling such stands.

  • Citation: Amateis, Ralph L.; Burkhart, Harold E. 2012. Extending the capabilities of an individual tree growth simulator to model non-traditional loblolly pine plantation systems for multiple products. In: Butnor, John R., ed. 2012. Proceedings of the 16th biennial southern silvicultural research conference. e-Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS-156. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service, Southern Research Station. 7-9.
  • Posted Date: August 28, 2012
  • Modified Date: August 28, 2012
  • Print Publications Are No Longer Available

    In an ongoing effort to be fiscally responsible, the Southern Research Station (SRS) will no longer produce and distribute hard copies of our publications. Many SRS publications are available at cost via the Government Printing Office (GPO). Electronic versions of publications may be downloaded, printed, and distributed.

    Publication Notes

    • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.
    • Our online publications are scanned and captured using Adobe Acrobat. During the capture process some typographical errors may occur. Please contact the SRS webmaster if you notice any errors which make this publication unusable.
    • To view this article, download the latest version of Adobe Acrobat Reader.