The hot continental division: Oak forests, fire, and ecosystem management frame fuels management questions

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  • Author(s): Stout, Susan L.; Dickinson, Matthew B.; Nowacki, Gregory J.
  • Date: 2012
  • Station ID: Book Chapter-SRS-161

Abstract

The Hot Continental Division is one of the larger ecoregions within the continental United States (McNab and Avers 1994), incorporating portions of 19 States and extending from the eastern seacoast to areas west of the Mississippi River (chapter 1). The Division includes the Eastern (Oceanic) and Eastern (Continental) Broadleaf Forest Provinces and two Mountain Provinces (Central Appalachian Broadleaf Forest—Coniferous Forest—Meadow Province and Ozark Broadleaf Forest—Meadow Forest), which are described in chapter 6. The entire Hot Continental Division is divided into 27 sections, 5 of which are in the mountains, and occupies 449,000 square miles (1 162 950 km2), or about 12 percent of the land area of the United States, based on U.S. land area of 3,678,190 square miles [http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/616563/United-States (Date accessed: August 8, 2011)].

  • Citation: Stout, Susan L.; Dickinson, Matthew B.; Nowacki, Gregory J. 2012. The hot continental division: Oak forests, fire, and ecosystem management frame fuels management questions. In: LaFayette, Russell; Brooks, Maureen T.; Potyondy, John P.; Audin, Lisa; Krieger, Suzanne L.; Trettin, Carl C. Eds. 2012. Cumulative watershed effects of fuel management in the Eastern United States. Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS-161. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service, Southern Research Station. 82-100.

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