Integrated Pest Management of the Southern Pine Beetle

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  • Authors: Coulson, Robert N.; Saarenmaa, Hannu
  • Publication Year: 2011
  • Publication Series: General Technical Report (GTR)
  • Source: In: Coulson, R.N.; Klepzig, K.D. 2011. Southern Pine Beetle II. Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS-140. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service, Southern Research Station. 431-446.

Abstract

Integrated pest management (IPM) is the maintenance of destructive agents, including insects, at tolerable levels by the planned use of a variety of preventive, suppressive, or regulatory tactics and strategies that are ecologically and economically efficient and socially and politically acceptable. It is explicit that the actions taken are fully integrated into the total forest and environmental management process –in both planning and operation. The concept, methodology, and practice evolved from extensive research and development projects conducted during the 1970s and 1980s. In this chapter we 1. provide a general overview of the IPM concept, 2. place IPM in the broader context of a multitiered management hierarchy, 3. define the forest settings where the southern pine beetle (SPB) is considered to be a pest, 4. examine the structure and component activities of an SPB IPM system, and 5. summarize the major research, development, and management actives in need of further study and elucidation.

  • Citation: Coulson, Robert N.; Saarenmaa, Hannu 2011. Integrated Pest Management of the Southern Pine Beetle. In: Coulson, R.N.; Klepzig, K.D. 2011. Southern Pine Beetle II. Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS-140. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service, Southern Research Station. 431-446.
  • Keywords: climate change, decision support, forest dynamics, integrated pest management, treatment tactics
  • Posted Date: September 29, 2011
  • Modified Date: September 29, 2011
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