Southern Pine Bark Beetle Guild

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  • Authors: Nebeker, T. Evan
  • Publication Year: 2011
  • Publication Series: General Technical Report (GTR)
  • Source: In: Coulson, R.N.; Klepzig, K.D. 2011. Southern Pine Beetle II. Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS-140. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service, Southern Research Station. 199-209.

Abstract

Dendroctonus frontalis (southern pine beetle), D. terebrans (black turpentine beetle), Ips avulsus (small southern pine engraver or four-spined engraver), I. grandicollis (five-spined engraver), and I. calligraphus (six-spined engraver) comprise the southern pine bark beetle guild. Often they are found sharing the same hosts in the Southeastern United States. They exhibit a preference for trees that are stressed to various degrees. Members of this guild utilize chemical, visual, and acoustic cues to locate their hosts. Each has characteristic egg gallery patterns that assist in the determination of the attacking species. Development is temperature-dependent, resulting in two or three generations per year for D. terebrans, the largest in size of the guild members, to 10 or more for I. avulsus, the smallest in size. It appears that for members of this guild that cue into hosts colonized by other guild members, the result is increased resource availability to each.

  • Citation: Nebeker, T. Evan 2011. Southern Pine Bark Beetle Guild. In: Coulson, R.N.; Klepzig, K.D. 2011. Southern Pine Beetle II. Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS-140. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service, Southern Research Station. 199-209.
  • Keywords: development, gallery construction, hosts, host selection, identification, interactions, signs, symptoms
  • Posted Date: September 27, 2011
  • Modified Date: September 27, 2011
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