Influence of alternative silvicultural treatments on spatial variability in light in central hardwood stands on the Cumberland Plateau

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  • Authors: Grayson, Stephen F.; Buckley, David S.; Henning, Jason G.; Schweitzer, Callie J.; Clark, Stacy L.
  • Publication Year: 2011
  • Publication Series: General Technical Report - Proceedings
  • Source: In: Fei, Songlin; Lhotka, John M.; Stringer, Jeffrey W.; Gottschalk, Kurt W.; Miller, Gary W., eds. Proceedings, 17th central hardwood forest conference; 2010 April 5-7; Lexington, KY; Gen. Tech. Rep. NRS-P-78. Newtown Square, PA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Northern Research Station: 669-670.

Abstract

Effective oak silvicultural treatments allow light to reach the forest floor with sufficient intensity and duration to enable establishment, growth, and development of preferred species. Although it is intuitive that increases in light will accompany various levels of canopy removal, specific amounts and the distribution of light resulting from different silvicultural treatments have not been precisely determined. Our objectives were to document the amounts and distribution of photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) in stands receiving alternative silvicultural treatments.

  • Citation: Grayson, Stephen F.; Buckley, David S.; Henning, Jason G.; Schweitzer, Callie J.; Clark, Stacy L. 2011. Influence of alternative silvicultural treatments on spatial variability in light in central hardwood stands on the Cumberland Plateau. In: Fei, Songlin; Lhotka, John M.; Stringer, Jeffrey W.; Gottschalk, Kurt W.; Miller, Gary W., eds. Proceedings, 17th central hardwood forest conference; 2010 April 5-7; Lexington, KY; Gen. Tech. Rep. NRS-P-78. Newtown Square, PA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Northern Research Station: 669-670.
  • Posted Date: June 29, 2011
  • Modified Date: June 29, 2011
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