Prospects for long-term ash survival in the core emerald ash borer mortality zone

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  • Authors: Marshall, Jordan M.; Storer, Andrew J.; Mech, Roger; Katovich, Steven A.
  • Publication Year: 2011
  • Publication Series: Other
  • Source: In: McManus, Katherine A; Gottschalk, Kurt W., eds. 2010. Proceedings. 21st U.S. Department of Agriculture interagency research forum on invasive species 2010; 2010 January 12-15; Annapolis, MD. Gen. Tech. Rep. NRS-P-75. Newtown Square, PA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Northern Research Station: 99.

Abstract

Attacking all North American ash species (Fraxinus spp.), emerald ash borer (EAB) (Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire) has caused significant mortality within its introduced range. For other forest pests, host bark plays an important role in infestation density and oviposition behavior. The objectives of this study were to (1) locate live ash trees in the core EAB-induced mortality zone in southeastern Michigan, (2) examine differences in live and neighboring dead trees in terms of d.b.h. and bark roughness, and (3) develop a deployable and simple ash mortality probability model.

  • Citation: Marshall, Jordan M.; Storer, Andrew J.; Mech, Roger; Katovich, Steven A. 2011. Prospects for long-term ash survival in the core emerald ash borer mortality zone. In: McManus, Katherine A; Gottschalk, Kurt W., eds. 2010. Proceedings. 21st U.S. Department of Agriculture interagency research forum on invasive species 2010; 2010 January 12-15; Annapolis, MD. Gen. Tech. Rep. NRS-P-75. Newtown Square, PA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Northern Research Station: 99.
  • Posted Date: April 12, 2011
  • Modified Date: April 12, 2011
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