Community and ecosystem consequences of Microstegium vimineum invasions in eastern forests

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  • Authors: Flory, S. Luke.
  • Publication Year: 2011
  • Publication Series: Other
  • Source: In: McManus, Katherine A; Gottschalk, Kurt W., eds. 2010. Proceedings. 21st U.S. Department of Agriculture interagency research forum on invasive species 2010; 2010 January 12-15; Annapolis, MD. Gen. Tech. Rep. NRS-P-75. Newtown Square, PA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Northern Research Station: 14-15.

Abstract

Over the past two decades, biological invasions have come to the forefront as a major factor driving global environmental change. Introduced species can reduce biodiversity, inhibit the natural process of succession, and alter ecosystem functions such as nutrient and carbon cycling. There is an urgent need to understand the effects of invasions on native systems in order to prioritize species for research and management, to motivate local citizens and governments to take action, and to inform policymakers and land managers.

  • Citation: Flory, S. Luke. 2011. Community and ecosystem consequences of Microstegium vimineum invasions in eastern forests. In: McManus, Katherine A; Gottschalk, Kurt W., eds. 2010. Proceedings. 21st U.S. Department of Agriculture interagency research forum on invasive species 2010; 2010 January 12-15; Annapolis, MD. Gen. Tech. Rep. NRS-P-75. Newtown Square, PA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Northern Research Station: 14-15.
  • Posted Date: April 5, 2011
  • Modified Date: April 5, 2011
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