Trends in global wildfire potential in a changing climate

  • Authors: Liu, Y.; Stanturf, J.A.; Goodrick, S.L.
  • Publication Year: 2009
  • Publication Series: Scientific Journal (JRNL)
  • Source: Forest Ecology and Management 259:685-697
  • DOI: 10.1016/j.foreco.2009.09.002

Abstract

The trend in global wildfire potential under the climate change due to the greenhouse effect is investigated. Fire potential is measured by the Keetch-Byram Drought Index (KBDI), which is calculated using the observed maximum temperature and precipitation and projected changes at the end of this century (2070–2100) by general circulation models (GCMs) for present and future climate conditions, respectively. It is shown that future wildfire potential increases significantly in the United States, South America, central Asia, southern Europe, southern Africa, and Australia. Fire potential moves up by one level in these regions, from currently low to future moderate potential or from moderate to high potential. Relative changes are the largest and smallest in southern Europe and Australia, respectively. The period with the KBDI greater than 400 (a simple definition for fire season in this study) becomes a few months longer. The increased fire potential is mainly caused by warming in the U.S., South America, and Australia and by the combination of warming and drying in the other regions. Sensitivity analysis shows that future fire potential depends on many factors such as climate model and emission scenario used for climate change projection. The results suggest dramatic increases in wildfire potential that will require increased future resources and management efforts for disaster prevention and recovery.

  • Citation: Liu, Y.; Stanturf, J.A.; Goodrick, S.L. 2009. Trends in global wildfire potential in a changing climate. Forest Ecology and Management 259:685-697.
  • Keywords: Wildfire potential, Climate change, Keetch-Byram Drought Index (BKDI), Projection
  • Posted Date: September 8, 2010
  • Modified Date: September 28, 2010
  • Print Publications Are No Longer Available

    In an ongoing effort to be fiscally responsible, the Southern Research Station (SRS) will no longer produce and distribute hard copies of our publications. Many SRS publications are available at cost via the Government Printing Office (GPO). Electronic versions of publications may be downloaded, printed, and distributed.

    Publication Notes

    • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.
    • Our online publications are scanned and captured using Adobe Acrobat. During the capture process some typographical errors may occur. Please contact the SRS webmaster if you notice any errors which make this publication unusable.
    • To view this article, download the latest version of Adobe Acrobat Reader.