Evaluation of micron-sized wood and bark particles as filler in thermoplastic composites

  • Authors: Harper, David P.; Eberhardt, Thomas L.
  • Publication Year: 2010
  • Publication Series: Miscellaneous Publication
  • Source: In: 10th International Conference on Wood & Biofiber Plastic Composites. Madison, WI: The Forest Products Society & The Printing House. 248-252.

Abstract

Micron-sized particles, prepared from loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) wood and bark, were evaluated for use in wood-plastic composites (WPCs). Particles were also prepared from hard (periderm) and soft (obliterated phloem) components in the bark and compared to whole wood (without bark) filler commonly used by the WPC industry. All bark fillers had different thermal degradation profiles and higher ash contents compared to whole wood and micron-sized wood particle samples. The bark particles had an increased nucleating ability on polypropylene over whole wood filler. However, a drop in modulus and decrease in interaction with matrix were observed by dynamic mechanical analysis. These characteristics of the bark particles impart significant constraints on their processing and utilization in WPCs.

  • Citation: Harper, David P.; Eberhardt, Thomas L. 2010. Evaluation of micron-sized wood and bark particles as filler in thermoplastic composites. In: 10th International Conference on Wood & Biofiber Plastic Composites. Madison, WI: The Forest Products Society & The Printing House. 248-252.
  • Posted Date: May 6, 2010
  • Modified Date: September 9, 2010
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