Long-term effects of fire and fire-return interval on population structure and growth of longleaf pine (Pinus palustris)

  • Authors: Ford, Chelcy R.; Minor, Emily S.; Fox, Gordon A.
  • Publication Year: 2010
  • Publication Series: Scientific Journal (JRNL)
  • Source: Can. J. For. Res. 40: 1410–1420
  • DOI: 10.1139

Abstract

We investigated the effect of fire and fire frequency on stand structure and longleaf pine (Pinus palustris P. Mill.) growth and population demography in an experimental research area in a southwest Florida sandhill community. Data were collected from replicated plots that had prescribed fire-return intervals of 1, 2, 5, or 7 years or were left unburned. Experimental treatment burns have been ongoing since 1976. Plots were sampled to estimate species distribution, stand structure, and longleaf pine density in four developmental stage classes: grass, bolting, small tree, and large tree. Tree-ring growth measurements in combination with burn history were used to evaluate the effects of fire and fire-return interval on basal area increment growth. Fire-return interval impacted stand structure and longleaf pine population structure. Our results suggest that recruitment from the bolting stage to later stages may become adversely affected with very frequent fires (e.g., every 1 or 2 years). Although adult tree productivity was negatively impacted during fire years, tree growth during years between fire events was resilient such that growth did not differ significantly among fire-return intervals. Our study shows that the longleaf pine population as a whole is strongly regulated by fire and fire-return interval plays a key role in structuring this population.

  • Citation: Ford, Chelcy R.; Minor, Emily S.; Fox, Gordon A. 2010. Long-term effects of fire and fire-return interval on population structure and growth of longleaf pine (Pinus palustris). Can. J. For. Res. 40: 1410–1420.
  • Posted Date: July 7, 2010
  • Modified Date: July 7, 2010
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