Litter-dwelling arthropod abundance peaks near coarse woody debris in loblolly pine forests of the southeastern United States

  • Author(s): Ulyshen, Michael D.; Hanula, James L.
  • Date: 2009
  • Source: Florida Entomologist
  • Station ID: JRNL-SRS-92

Abstract

r-dwelling arthropod and other invertebrate taxa (e.g., Isopoda, Chilopoda, Diplopoda, Araneae, Pseudoscorpionida, Coleoptera, and Gastropoda) are more numerous near dead wood than away from it in the broad-leaved forests of Europe(Jabin et al. 2004; Topp et al. 2006a, 2006b; Kappes et al. 2006; Kappes 2006; Jabin et al. 2007) and New Zealand (Evans et al. 2003). Whether these trends hold true in pine-dominated forests, such as those in the southeastern United States, remains unknown. To address this question, we sampled litter dwelling arthropods adjacent (≤15 cm) to, and away (>2 m) from, logs at 3 stages of decay in loblolly pine (Pinus taedaL.) forests in South Carolina, USA.

  • Citation: . . Litter-dwelling arthropod abundance peaks near coarse woody debris in loblolly pine forests of the southeastern United States. Florida Entomologist.

Requesting Publications

You can order print copies of our publications through our publication ordering system. Make a note of the publication you wish to request, and visit our Publication Order Site.

Publication Notes

  • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.
  • Our on-line publications are scanned and captured using Adobe Acrobat. During the capture process some typographical errors may occur. Please contact the SRS webmaster if you notice any errors which make this publication unuseable.
  • To view this article, download the latest version of Adobe Acrobat Reader.