Base-treated juniper fiber media for removing heavy metals in stormwater runoff

  • Authors: Min, S.-H.; Eberhardt, Thomas; Min, Jang
  • Publication Year: 2007
  • Publication Series: Miscellaneous Publication
  • Source: Polish Journal of Environmental Studies Vol. 16, No.5 2007, 731-738

Abstract

The viability of base-treated juniper fiber (BTJF) media for removing toxic heavy metals (Cd2+, Cu2+, Pb2+, Zn2+) in stormwater runoff was investigated. The sorption ability ofthe BTJF for all metals was much higher than that of untreated juniper. The affinity sequence of both materials, BTJF and untreated juniper, was Pb > Cu > Zn ≥ Cd. This order is explained by the hydrolysis constants for each metal. A metal desorption and column regeneration test using 0.1 M nitric acid showed that the metal sorption capacity declined slightly from 136.3 to 119.2 µmole/g in the first two cycles and then more significantly at the third and fourth regeneration, 72.3 and 83.1 µmole/g, respectively. Based on the hydraulic conductivity test of BTJF of different size classes, it can be deduced that there is no major headloss-related disadvantage in using BTJF instead of sand as stormwater filter media if the particle size of the BTJF is similar to that for sand.

  • Citation: Min, S.-H.; Eberhardt, Thomas; Min, Jang 2007. Base-treated juniper fiber media for removing heavy metals in stormwater runoff. Polish Journal of Environmental Studies Vol. 16, No.5 2007, 731-738
  • Keywords: filter, heavy metal, hydraulic conductivity, juniper, stormwater
  • Posted Date: December 22, 2008
  • Modified Date: October 7, 2016
  • Print Publications Are No Longer Available

    In an ongoing effort to be fiscally responsible, the Southern Research Station (SRS) will no longer produce and distribute hard copies of our publications. Many SRS publications are available at cost via the Government Printing Office (GPO). Electronic versions of publications may be downloaded, printed, and distributed.

    Publication Notes

    • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.
    • Our online publications are scanned and captured using Adobe Acrobat. During the capture process some typographical errors may occur. Please contact the SRS webmaster if you notice any errors which make this publication unusable.
    • To view this article, download the latest version of Adobe Acrobat Reader.