Scale of harvesting by non-industrial private forest landowners

  • Authors: Vokoun, Melinda; Amacher, Gregory S.; Wear, David N.
  • Publication Year: 2006
  • Publication Series: Scientific Journal (JRNL)
  • Source: Journal of Forest Economics, Vol. 11: 223-244
  • DOI: 10.1093/jof/106.1.47

Abstract

We examine the intensity of harvesting decision by non-industrial landowners at the lowest price offer they deem acceptable, using a multiple bounded discrete choice stated preference approach that draws upon and connects two subfields of forestry, one identifying characteristics of landowners important to past harvesting or reforestation decisions, and another proposing how landowners evaluate price offers for forest harvesting decisions. Variables important to harvest intensity choices when the landowners find an acceptable price have only been considered for those landowners who actually have participated in harvesting markets, whereas here we examine the behavior of these individuals as well as those who are on the margin (i.e., have not harvested at prevailing current or past market prices). We show that harvest intensity depends critically on the extent of urbanization, indicated by the presence of structures on a parcel as well as forested tract size, along with landowner characteristics such as absenteeism and length of ownership. The results are useful for understanding the timber management behavior for a majority of landowners who may not harvest at prevailing prices, but may participate should prices reach a level acceptable to them, where this level is determined by individual preferences for standing timber resources.

  • Citation: Vokoun, Melinda; Amacher, Gregory S.; Wear, David N. 2006. Scale of harvesting by non-industrial private forest landowners. Journal of Forest Economics, Vol. 11: 223-244
  • Keywords: non-industrial private forest landowners, timber supply, stated preferences
  • Posted Date: November 27, 2007
  • Modified Date: October 11, 2018
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