Hydrologic behavior of gullies in the South Carolina piedmont

  • Authors: Galang, M.A.; Jackson, C.R.; Morris, L.A.; Markewitz, D.; Carter, E.A.
  • Publication Year: 2007
  • Publication Series: Miscellaneous Publication
  • Source: In: T.C. Rasmussen, G.D. Carroll, and A. P. Georgakakos (Eds.). Proceedings of the 2007 Georgia Water Resources Conference, March 27-29, 2007, University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia, USA. 633 pp.

Abstract

The Piedmont region in the United States has been eroded and gullied due to deforestation and cultivation during the 1700 and 1800. Currently, a majority of these gullies are under forest vegetation and appear stable; however, neither the hydrology of these gullies, nor their sediment contribution to surface waters, has been quantified. This study instrumented eight gullies ranging in size from 36-90 m long, 2.4 to 9.5 m wide, and 0.9 to 3.0 m deep with weirs, stage recorders, and stormwater samplers to assess gully response to prescribed burning. Results from pre-burn data show that only four out of the eight gullies exhibit flow during storm events ranging up to 25.7 mm. Higher rainfall amounts, such as those achieved during hurricanes, may be needed to initiate flow in all gullies. This observation has implications for understanding gully re-activation and associated erosion.

  • Citation: Galang, M.A.; Jackson, C.R.; Morris, L.A.; Markewitz, D.; Carter, E.A. 2007. Hydrologic behavior of gullies in the South Carolina piedmont. In: T.C. Rasmussen, G.D. Carroll, and A. P. Georgakakos (Eds.). Proceedings of the 2007 Georgia Water Resources Conference, March 27-29, 2007, University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia, USA. 633 pp.
  • Posted Date: October 19, 2007
  • Modified Date: January 28, 2008
  • Print Publications Are No Longer Available

    In an ongoing effort to be fiscally responsible, the Southern Research Station (SRS) will no longer produce and distribute hard copies of our publications. Many SRS publications are available at cost via the Government Printing Office (GPO). Electronic versions of publications may be downloaded, printed, and distributed.

    Publication Notes

    • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.
    • Our online publications are scanned and captured using Adobe Acrobat. During the capture process some typographical errors may occur. Please contact the SRS webmaster if you notice any errors which make this publication unusable.
    • To view this article, download the latest version of Adobe Acrobat Reader.